TITLE:                    Medicolegal Aspects of Child Abuse.

 

AUTHOR:               Myers, J. E. B.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Pacific Univ., Sacramento, CA. McGeorge School of Law.

 

SOURCE:                In: Reece, R. M. (Editor). Treatment of Child Abuse: Common Mental Health, Medical, and Legal Practitioners. Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD., 2000;  p. 36

 

ABSTRACT:           Children s statements during examinations and interviews have forensic as well as medical significance. Under certain circumstances, the child s statements are inadmissible as evidence, due to the hearsay rules of evidence. There are, however, important exceptions. They include the excited utterance exception, disclosure under the doctrine of fresh complaint, statements made during diagnostic or treatment services, and the residual and child hearsay exceptions. Interviewing techniquesmust include the avoidance of suggestive or leading questions. Confidentiality and privileged communication have well-defined boundaries, and child abuse reporting laws override confidentiality and privilege. A professional called upon to appear in court as an expert witness should review only those portions of the record needed for the testimony and should document the parts of the record reviewed. Privileged and nonprivileged materials should be separated in the record. If one takes the record tocourt, limit what is taken to the intended testimony. If possible, do not take the record to the witness stand, and if it is taken, refer to it only if necessary. Expert testimony usually takes one of three forms: an opinion, an answer to a hypotheticalquestion, or a lecture providing information to the judge or jury. Be prepared for cross-examination, understanding that the defense attorney will try to raise doubts about the expert testimony. This is done by trying to limit the expert s ability to explain, by undermining the expert s assumptions, by impeaching the expert with a learned treatise, or by raising the issue of the expert s bias toward the prosecution. 33 references. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         medical aspects of child abuse;  physicians role;  legal processes;  expert testimony;  expert witnesses;  rules of evidence;  hearsay rule;  confidentiality

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Chapter in Book

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.press.jhu.edu

 

 

TITLE:                    Social Support and the Relationship Between Family and Community Violence Exposure and Psychopathology Among High Risk Adolescents.

 

AUTHOR:               Muller, R. T.;  Goebel-Fabbri, A. E.;  Diamond, T.;  Dinklage, D.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Abuse and Neglect

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    York Univ., Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Psychology.

 

SOURCE:                24(4): pp. 449-464;  Elsevier Science Ltd., New York, NY., April 2000;  p. 170

 

ABSTRACT:           The objective of this study was to examine the protective effect of social support in the relationship between exposure to violence and psychopathology. Exposure to violence in the family and exposure to violence in the community were examined separately. Exposure to violence was further divided according to whether violence was experienced as a victim or as a witness. Internalizing and externalizing forms of psychopathology, as well as post-traumatic stress symptomatology were measured. Participants consisted of 65 high-risk adolescents admitted consecutively to psychiatric inpatient units. Data were collected by means of individual interviews, self-report questionnaires, and hospital charts. Social support emerged as a protective factor with respect to the maladaptive effects of family violence, experienced as either a victim or as a witness. In contrast, social support did not appear to buffer the maladaptive effects of community violence, regardless of whether violence was experienced as a victim or as a witness. In fact, the relationship between community violence and psychopathology was found to be generally nonsignificant regardless of social support status. These findings suggest that exposure to family violence may affect development differently than exposure to community violence, allowing social support to effectively buffer the effects of family, but not community, violence. This finding highlights the importance of examining violence exposure that occurs within the family separately from violence exposure that occurs within the community. 58 references and 10 tables.

 

KEY TERMS:         adolescents;  psychopathology;  sequelae;  community violence;  family violence;  social isolation;  resilience;  child witnesses of family violence

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    Revealing the Existence of Child Abuse in the Context of Marital Breakdown and Custody and Access Disputes.

 

AUTHOR:               Brown, T.;  Frederico, M.;  Hewitt, L.;  Sheehan, R.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Abuse and Neglect

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Monash Univ., Clayton, VIC (Australia). Dept. of Social Work and Human Services.

 

SOURCE:                24(6): pp. 849-859;  Elsevier Science, Ltd., New York, NY., June 2000;  p. 201

 

ABSTRACT:           This article presents the findings of a study of how the Family Court of Australia dealt with child abuse allegations in custody and visitation cases. The study sought to discover who were the families bringing these problems to family courts, what precisely the abuse was and how the courts managed the cases. Data were collected from a review of the court records of approximately 200 families where child abuse allegations had been made in custody and access disputes, observations of court proceedings, and interviews with court and related services staff. The findings showed that these cases had become a core component of the court s workload without any public or professional awareness of this change; that the abuse was real; that it was severe and serious; and that the courts and child protection services did not provide appropriate services to the families. Based on these results, a new specialized intervention system was developed that may be suitable internationally for implementation. 28 references and 4 tables. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         custody disputes;  visiting privileges;  disclosure;  divorce;  marital conflicts;  courts role;  australia;  prevalence

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    Characteristics, Experiences, and Outcomes of Adolescents Served in Long-Term Foster Care.

 

AUTHOR:               Downs, A. C.;  Wolf, M.;  Pecora, P. J.;  Williams, J.;  Dye, J.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Casey Family Program, Seattle, WA.

 

SOURCE:                Presented at: Society for Research in Adolescence Biennial Meeting, Chicago, IL., March 30-April 2, 2000;  p. 203

 

ABSTRACT:           Pre-care, care, and initial post-care characteristics of 1,611 individuals who received long-term foster care through The Casey Family Program from 1966-1998 were investigated using in-depth case record reviews. The findings suggested that services provided during foster care were directly related to the severity of pre-care maltreatment, with more abuse leading to more services. The findings also indicate that some services were directly related to more positive outcomes at case closure; specifically, independent living and employment experiences were related to attainment of high school diploma or GED. A historical analysis of services over a 33 year period indicated that in recent years, youth served were more likely to come from abusive backgrounds filled with family violence and caregiver substance abuse. In recent years, youths were more likely to be placed in kinship foster care and were more likely to receive an array of specialized services (e.g., mental health care). These results will be supplemented by interviews with alumni who consent to be interviewed in a subsequent study. 2 references and 12 tables. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         foster care research;  outcomes;  long term foster care;  adolescents;  sequelae;  individual characteristics;  service delivery;  program evaluation

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Proceedings Paper

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.casey.org

 

 

TITLE:                    Permanent Family Placement for Children of Minority Ethnic Origin.

 

AUTHOR:               Thoburn, J.;  Norford, L.;  Rashid, S. P.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    East Anglia Univ., Norwich (United Kingdom). Centre for Research on the Child and Family.

 

SOURCE:                Jessica Kingsley Publishers, London (United Kingdom)., June 2000;  p. 245

 

ABSTRACT:           This book reports the findings of a longitudinal study of the development of ethnic identity in minority children placed in foster care and adoption. Case records of 297 children placed in foster care or adoption were reviewed, and interviews were conducted with 51 families 10-15 years after placement. The goals of the research were to describe the experiences of children and parents within the newly created families and to identify differences in the parenting strategies of white and minority ethnic parents. At the time of the study, 24 percent of placements had broken down. Correlations with placement disruption included history of deprivation or abuse before placement; older age of child at time of placement; and behavior problems of the child at placement. There was no relationship between family variables (matched or transracial placment) and placement outcomes. However, interviews with children and parents revealed higher levels of stress among transracially placed children because of their separation from their ethnic and cultural identity. In addition to the usual responsibilities of adoptive and foster parents to each the transition into the new family, white parents faced additional stress related to meeting their children s needs for integration with their heritage. Numerous references, 15 figures, and 33 tables.

 

KEY TERMS:         permanency planning;  minority adoption;  minority groups;  ethnic studies;  transracial adoption;  transracial foster care;  outcomes;  longitudinal studies

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Book

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.jkp.com

 

 

TITLE:                    Evaluation of the London (Ontario) Community Group Treatment Programme for Children Who Have Witnessed Woman Abuse.

 

AUTHOR:               Suderman, M.;  Marshall, L.;  Loosely, S.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment and Trauma

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Thames Valle District School Board, London, ON (Canada).

 

SOURCE:                3(1): pp. 127-146;  Haworth Press, Inc., Binghamton, NY., 2000;  p. 254

 

ABSTRACT:           This article describes a community group model of intervention for children exposed to woman abuse, and an evaluation approach used to assess the impact of such groups. The collaborative development of the questionnaire-interview evaluation instruments for this purpose is described, and the set of instruments is presented in its entirety. The main instrument was tailored to the content of the groups and covers topics such as definitions and understanding of abuse, safety skills, beliefs and attitudes about abuse, perceived responsibility for abuse, alternatives to violence, non-violent conflict resolution strategies, and help-seeking skills. Both closed-ended and open-ended questions are employed. Separate questionnaires assess consumer (mother or caregiver and child) satisfaction and feedback. The results of a study evaluating the groups are described, which showed positive changes from pre to post intervention, as well as a high degree of satisfaction among children and mothers with regard to the groups. 17 references. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         program evaluation;  child witnesses of family violence;  group therapy;  therapeutic effectiveness;  community intervention projects;  assessment;  program models;  canada

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.haworthpressinc.com

 

 

TITLE:                    Tips for Investigating Child Fatalities.

 

AUTHOR:               Lee, D.;  May, J.;  O'Keefe, E.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Update

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    American Prosecutors Research Institute, Alexandria, VA. National Center for Prosecution of Child Abuse.

 

SOURCE:                13(1): pp. 1-2;  American Prosecutors Research Institute, Alexandria, VA. National Center for Prosecution of Child Abuse., 2000;  p. 268

 

ABSTRACT:           This article provides checklists for the investigation of child fatalities. Suggestions are presented for identifying and interviewing witnesses, examining the suspected crime scene, creating a timeline of the child s last hours or days, and analyzing data. Potential witnesses include the medical professionals who treated the child, emergency personnel, patrol officers, parents, caregivers, and neighbors. After hearing the parents explanation of the child s death, investigators should specifically seize the object involved in the child s death, clothes and diapers of the child, the caretakers clothes, bottles and food containers, poisons and medicines, home videos and photographs, and medical records. The timeline will clarify the progression of the events that lead to the child s death and the veracity of the caretaker s explanation.

 

KEY TERMS:         investigations;  child fatalities;  interviews;  protocols;  guidelines;  police operating procedures;  police responsibility;  police role

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    Assessing the Value of Structured Protocols for Forensic Interviews of Alleged Child Abuse

 

AUTHOR:               Orbach, Y.;  Hershkowitz, I.;  Lamb, M. E.;  Sternberg, K. J.;  et al.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Abuse and Neglect

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

 

SOURCE:                24(6): pp. 733-752;  Elsevier Science, Ltd., New York, NY., June 2000;  p. 273

 

ABSTRACT:           This study evaluated the effectiveness of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Investigative Interview Protocol, a structured protocol of universally recommended guidelines for forensic interviews. The protocol was designed to maximize the amount of information obtained using recall memory probes, which are likely to elicit more accurate information than recognition memory probes. Forensic investigators were trained to use the protocol while conducting feedback-monitored simulation interviews. The utility of the protocol was then evaluated by comparing 55 protocol interviews with 50 prior interviews by the same investigators, matched with respect to characteristics likely to affect the richness of the children's accounts. The comparison was based on an analysis of the investigators' utterance types, distribution, and timing, as well as quantitative and qualitative characteristics of the information produced. As predicted, protocol interviews containedmore open-ended prompts overall as well as before the first option-posing utterance than non-protocol interviews did. More details were obtained using open-ended invitations and fewer were obtained using focused questions in protocol interviews than in non-protocol interviews, although the total number of details elicited did not differ significantly. In both conditions, older children provided more details than younger children did. The findings confirmed that implementation of professionally recommended practices affected the behavior of interviewers in both the pre-substantive and substantive phases of their interviews and enhanced the quality (i.e., likely accuracy) of information elicited from alleged victims. 101 references and 6 tables.(Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         interviews;  investigations;  child witnesses;  protocols;  validity;  sexual abuse;  measures

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    Family Decision Meeting Project.

 

INST. AUTHOR:    Portland State Univ., OR. Child Welfare Partnership.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

SOURCE:                Portland State Univ., OR. Child Welfare Partnership., 2000;  p. 278

 

ABSTRACT:           Participants in 26 Family Unity Meetings in Oregon were interviewed before and after their meetings to determine the satisfaction of families with the family group decision making process and best practices for facilitation. In additionto interviews with caseworkers and birth parents, data were collected from observations of meetings and written evaluations. Findings revealed that the needs of the family were best addressed when more family members attended the meetings. However, family members did not realize that non-relatives who could also provide support could have also been invited. Barriers to attendance included the schedules of providers, geographical distance for family members, and employment. Several factors influenced the degree that family members participated in the discussion, such as knowledge about the meeting process; personal characteristics and comfort with speaking in the group; support for their position; and efforts by providers to involve the family in the conversation. Participants who were not willing to share information during the meeting attributed their resistance to distrust of the system, intra-family dynamics (loyalty, fear), legal implications, or confidentiality. Recommendations for improving the process address preparation of participants, meeting format, logistics (timing and location), clarification of the goal of the meetings, and adequate facilitation. The Oregon model involves a series of meetings, rather than one meeting endorsed by other family group approaches. The series format promotes team building, accountability, management of segments of the plan, and early identification of problems. 7 references and 10 tables.

 

KEY TERMS:         decision making;  family group conferencing;  program models;  program evaluation;  child welfare research;  oregon;  qualitative research;  case plans

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Final Report

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.fgdm.org/

 

 

TITLE:                    Linking Childhood Sexual Abuse and Abusive Parenting: The Mediating Role of Maternal Anger.

 

AUTHOR:               DiLillo, D.;  Tremblay, G. C.;  Peterson, L.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Abuse and Neglect

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Dept. of Psychology.

 

SOURCE:                24(6): pp. 767-779;  Elsevier Science, Ltd., New York, NY., June 2000;  p. 280

 

ABSTRACT:           This study had two primary objectives: first to examine the association between childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and later parenting characteristics, particularly physical abuse potential, and second, to explore maternal anger as a mediatorof the relationship between CSA and adult physical abuse potential. The community sample included 138 mothers classified as having experienced CSA and a comparison group of 152 non-sexually abused mothers. Parenting variables included the mothers physical abuse potential, nurturance toward their children, unrealistic developmental expectations of children, as well as frequencies of spanking and general punishment. Data was collected via interview and other self-report measures. Even after controlling for mothers childhood experience of physical abuse, CSA significantly predicted adult risk of physically abusing one s own children. Further, maternal anger was confirmed as a mediator of the relationship between having been sexually abused as a child and the potential for physically abusing one s own children. CSA may be a risk factor for subsequent physically abusive parenting, while anger appears to play a significant role in mediating this relationship. Findings are discussed in the context of current knowledge concerning the impact of child sexual abuse and the processes contributing to abusive parenting. 48 references, 1 figure, and 4 tables. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         sexual abuse;  adults abused as children;  parental behavior;  risk factors;  child abuse research;  anger;  maternal behavior;  characteristics of abuser

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    Domestic Violence in Child Welfare Preventative Services: Results From an Intake Screening Questionnaire.

 

AUTHOR:               Magen, R. H.;  Conroy, K.;  Del Tufo, A.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Children and Youth Services Review

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Alaska Univ., Anchorage. Dept. of Social Work.

 

SOURCE:                22(3-4): pp. 251-274;  Elsevier Science Ltd., New York, NY., March-April 2000;  p. 287

 

ABSTRACT:           This paper describes the results from a domestic violence screening questionnaire implemented in neighborhood-based child welfare preventive service agencies. The goal of these preventive services agencies is to avert the unnecessary placement of children into foster care as well as to prevent child maltreatment. The project described in this paper was designed to systematically change the manner in which child welfare preventive service agencies identified and worked with battered women. Components of the project included recruitment of participant agencies; training of the workers in domestic violence identification; and the use of a new screening questionnaire during intake interviews with women clients. Findings indicated that training enhanced identification; women appreciated being asked about current and historical abuse; and that women felt better able to protect themselves and their children after disclosure of domestic violence to the worker. A secondary effect of the project was that child welfare agencies developed specific services for batterers, battered women, and their children. 23 references and 5 tables. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         battered women;  spouse abuse;  child welfare services;  assessment;  multiproblem families;  prevention programs;  identification;  disclosure

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    Helping Substance-Abusing Mothers in the Child-Welfare System: Turning Crisis Into

 

AUTHOR:               Sun, A.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Families in Society

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Nevada Univ. School of Social Work, Las Vegas. Greenspun Coll. of Urban Affairs.

 

SOURCE:                81(2): pp. 142-151;  Families International, Inc., Milwaukee, WI., March-April 2000;  p. 288

 

ABSTRACT:           This paper integrates in-depth interviews with eight mothers and existing relative literature, explaining the recovery journey of substance-abusing mothers in the child welfare system. The results show that these mothers longed for a mainstream dream (a better life, meaningful relationships, and self-actualization), perhaps because of, as well as for the sake of, their children. However, for them to achieve their dreams, the support of various external systems is necessary, treating mothers and children as one unit, facilitating nonusing social networks, and providing case management and life-skills training. Child protective service caseworkers can serve as key persons to help these mothers turn crisis into opportunity. 36 references and 1 figure. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         child welfare services;  substance abusing mothers;  service delivery;  family centered services;  family support systems;  service integration;  case management;  parent education

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.manticore.ca

 

 

TITLE:                    How Sexual Abuse Interviews Go Astray: Implications for Prosecutors, Police, and Child Protection Services.

 

AUTHOR:               Wood, J. M.;  Garven, S.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Maltreatment

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Texas Univ., El Paso. Dept. of Psychology.

 

SOURCE:                5(2): pp. 109-118;  Sage Publications, Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA., May 2000;  p. 304

 

ABSTRACT:           This article argues that child sexual abuse interviews can go astray in two different ways: improper interviewing has the potential to elicit false allegations from children and clumsy interviewing does not typically produce false allegations, but may have other negative consequences, particularly for child victims. The article clarifies the distinction between the two kinds of bad interviewing and suggests that clumsy interviewing is the more common of the two. The potential negative consequences of both improper and clumsy interviewing are described, along with implications for prosecutors, police, and child protection services. Improper interviewing can probably be eliminated rather easily, but clumsy interviewing may be considerably more resistant to change. 65 references. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         sexual abuse;  interviews;  investigations;  child witnesses;  sequelae;  leading questions;  methods;  false allegations

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    Behavior Problems, Academic Skill Delays and School Failure Among School-Aged Children in Foster Care: Their Relationship to Placement Characteristics.

 

AUTHOR:               Zima, B. T.;  Bussing, R.;  Freeman, S.;  Yang, X.;  et al.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Journal of Child and Family Studies

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    California Univ., Los Angeles. Dept. of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences.

 

SOURCE:                9(1): pp. 87-103;  Kluwer Academic-Human Sciences Press, Dordrecht (The Netherlands0., March 2000;  p. 310

 

ABSTRACT:           This article describes the level of behavior problems, academic skill delays, and school failure among school-aged children in foster care. It also examines how behavior problems are associated with academic problems and explores how these outcomes are related to children s placement characteristics. Foster parent and child home interviews, as well as teacher telephone interviews were conducted from a randomly selected sample of 302 children aged 6 through 12 years living in out-of-home placement. Interviews included standardized screening measures. Results showed that 27 percent of the children scored in the clinical range for a behavior problem, and 34 percent were rated as having at least one behavior problem in the classroom. Twenty-three percent of the children had severe delays in reading or math. Thirteen percent had repeated a grade and 14 percent had a history of school suspension and-or expulsion. Behavior problems by foster parent report were related to child suspension and-or expulsion from school, but were not associated with severe academic delays or grade retention. Placement characteristics were only sometimes related to these outcomes. Future studies examining the mental health and educational needs of this population should take into account the child s sociodemographic and placement characteristics. 37 references and 4 tables. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         behavior problems;  child behavior;  foster children;  foster care;  foster care research;  academic achievement;  school problems;  academic ability

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.wkap.nl

 

 

TITLE:                    Dependency Mediation: Help for Families and Courts.

 

AUTHOR:               Thoennes, N.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Juvenile and Family Court Journal

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Center for Policy Research, Denver, CO.

 

SOURCE:                51(2): pp. 13-22;  National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, Reno, NV., Spring 2000;  p. 334

 

ABSTRACT:           The findings of an evaluation of the dependency mediation program implemented by Colorado s Fourth Judicial District are highlighted in this article. Data for the evaluation were collected from interviews with participants, and a reviewof case and court records. Initiated in 1995, the dependency mediation program currently serves more than 400 court referred cases. The average mediation meeting lasts about 1.8 hours and usually results in consensus about a plan for placement and reunification. Mediation plans do not differ from non-mediation plans regarding placement with relatives. However, the mediation plans addresses visitation more frequently than the plans developed without personal input. Although many professionals resisted the use of mediation when it first began, most currently believe it to be the most effective way to settle cases. Approximately 70 percent of cases sent to mediation result in an agreement for child protection. The costs of cases settled withoutmediation are an estimated 1.65 times the cost of mediation. Further savings are realized from the avoidance of a two-day trial when cases are resolved at mediation. 4 tables.

 

KEY TERMS:         dependency mediation;  nonadversarial case resolution;  courts role;  program models;  program evaluation;  colorado;  family reunification;  program costs

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://ncjfcj.unr.edu

 

 

TITLE:                    Using Video Vignettes to Evaluate Children's Personal Safety Knowledge: Methodological and Ethical Issues.

 

AUTHOR:               Johnson, B.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Abuse and Neglect

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    South Australia Univ., Adelaide (Australia). Centre for Research in Education, Equity and Work.

 

SOURCE:                24(6): pp. 811-827;  Elsevier Science Ltd., New York, NY., June 2000;  p. 339

 

ABSTRACT:           This study aimed to assess children s personal safety knowledge by seeking their responses to video-delivered simulations of child maltreatment. The article describes the methodological and ethical difficulties encountered in the research. The problems arose during several phases of consultation, the refinement of an interview protocol to be used with the vignettes, and during discussions over the ethical integrity of the research. Using visually graphic vignettes to probe children s personal safety knowledge proved to be methodologically difficult and ethically problematic and controversial. The main objections to the approach were that it could harm participants, and that parents needed extensive information about the study to exercise informed consent. The study demonstrated the nature and extent of negotiations that were needed to push the boundaries of evaluation research to develop more valid, authentic, and complex ways of accessing children s thinking about personal safety concepts and strategies. 33 references and 2 figures. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         personal safety;  assessment;  videotaping;  evaluation methods;  ethics;  research methodology;  child abuse research;  primary prevention

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    The Unmet Health Needs of America's Children.

 

AUTHOR:               Newacheck, P. W.;  Hughes, D. C.;  Hung, Y.;  Wong, S.;  Stoddard, J. J.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Pediatrics

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    California Univ., San Francisco. Institute for Health Policy Studies.

 

SOURCE:                105(5): pp. 989-997;  American Academy of Pediatrics, Elk Grove Village, IL., April 2000;  p. 349

 

ABSTRACT:           Unmet need for health care is a critical indicator of access problems. Among children, unmet need for care has special significance, as the failure to obtain treatment can often affect health status in the near- and long-term. This study presents current prevalence estimates and descriptive characteristics of children with unmet needs using nationally representative household survey data. The authors analyzed four years of National Health Interview Survey data spanning 1993 to 1996. Analysis included 97,206 children under the age of 18 years. They measured unmet need for medical care, dental care, prescription medications and vision care. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to assess the degree to which unmet need was related to the demographic and socioeconomic status of the child and family. Results indicated that 4.7 million, or 7.3 percent, of children in the United States experienced at least one unmet health care need, of which dental care was most prevalent. Children in poverty were nearly three times more likely to have an unmet need; and uninsured children were also nearly three times more likely to have an unmet need, compared with privately insured children. Conclusions state that unmet needs remain prevalent among children, supporting the need for public policy that addresses financial and nonfinancial barriers to care to reduce the risk. Two figures; three tables; 18 references. (Author abstract modified.)

 

KEY TERMS:         barriers;  health services;  children;  adolescents;  socioeconomic status;  data collection;  data analysis;  national surveys

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    Criminal Investigation of Child Sexual Abuse: A Comparison of Cases Referred to the Prosecutor to Those Not Referred.

 

AUTHOR:               Stroud, D. D.;  Martens, S. L.;  Barker, J.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Abuse and Neglect

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque. Dept. of Psychology.

 

SOURCE:                24(5): pp. 689-700;  Elsevier Science Ltd., New York, NY., May 2000;  p. 359

 

ABSTRACT:           This study sought to identify characteristics of child sexual abuse cases that differentiate cases referred for criminal prosecution from those not referred. Related research had indicated that sexually abused children not involved in the criminal court process had experienced much greater distress, depression, and anxiety and were more likely to have a family member as the alleged perpetrator. The authors conducted an exploratory analysis of children who completed a forensic interview to determine the differentiation in cases that were referred to prosecution and those who were not. The study sample consisted of 1,043 children, of which 587, or 56 percent, had cases referred for criminal prosecution and 45, or 44 percent, did not. Differences between criminal action and dropped cases were found in relation to the children (age, sex, and ethnicity), the alleged offenders (age, sex, and relationship to child), and the case characteristics (disclosure and injury to the child). Conclusions suggest that due to the adversarial nature of the U.S. criminal justice system, problems still exist when criminally prosecuting sexual abuse charges, particularly when the offender involved is related to the victim. Recommendations include that regular notification of criminal investigation status be required to the children and families involved, in support of all children involved in sexual abuse receiving a forensic interview. Three tables, one figure, 19 references.

 

KEY TERMS:         investigations;  sexual abuse;  criminal justice system;  sampling studies;  data analysis;  courts;  child protective services;  families

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    Findings From a UK Based Study of Late Permanent Placements.

 

AUTHOR:               Rushton, A.;  Dance, C.;  Quinton, D.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Adoption Quarterly

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Maudsley Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Institute of Psychiatry.

 

SOURCE:                3(3): pp. 51-71;  Haworth Press, Inc., Binghamton, NY., 2000;  p. 403

 

ABSTRACT:           This prospective, United Kingdom-based adoption study examined the first year of placement of 61 boys and girls who joined permanent unrelated families during middle childhood. Most of the children had experienced abuse, neglect and discontinuity in their lives prior to this placement. The psycho-social functioning of the children and the development of family relationships were assessed by means of in-depth interviews with the new parents. High levels of behavior problems were found in the children initially. About one-third of the children showed a diminution of problems after placement, the remainder showed few changes or deterioration. At the end of the first year, 72 percent of the surviving placements were considered stable. An active rejection by birth parents stood out as a particular risk to placement stability, especially when accompanied by over active behavior and where new parents had difficulty in maintaining warmth and sensitivity in their responses to the child in the early months of placement. 27 references, 2 figures, and 3 tables. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         great britain;  adoption research;  child behavior;  behavior problems;  adjustment problems;  outcomes;  permanency planning;  adoption preservation

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.haworthpressinc.com

 

 

TITLE:                    Sexual Abuse Characteristics Associated With Survivor Psychopathology.

 

AUTHOR:               Ruggiero, K. J.;  McLeer, S. V.;  Dixon, J. F.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Abuse and Neglect

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    West Virginia Univ., Morgantown. Dept. of Psychology.

 

SOURCE:                24(7): pp. 951-964;  Elsevier Science Ltd., New York, NY., July 2000;  p. 423

 

ABSTRACT:           Eighty sexually abused children were administered a structured diagnostic interview and a variety of rating-scale instruments designed to examine predictors of psychopathology in non-clinically referred, sexually abused children, ages 6-16 years, 30-60 days following abuse disclosure and termination. Several forms of psychopathology were assessed, including posttraumatic stress, global functioning, anxiety, depression, and externalizing behavior. Abuse interviews also were used to guide the collection of demographic (victim age, gender) and abuse-related information (e.g., frequency of abuse). Abuse-related factors and demographic variables accounted for greater than half of the variance predicting global functioning, and accurately predicted posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) status for 86 percent of the participants. Also, analyses yielded significant predictors of parent-reported attention problems and sexual behavior. Of additional importance, none of the abuse-related and demographic variables predicted scores on measures of general anxiety, depression, and externalizing behavior. Specific demographic and sexual abuse information may, to some extent, be used to identify children who are at increased riskfor short-term post-abuse psychopathology. Although the present findings suggest that such information may not be useful in the prediction of general anxiety, depression, and externalizing behavior, demographic and abuse-related variables importantly appear to account for significant variance in the prediction of global functioning, posttraumatic stress, attentiveness, and sexual behavior. Additional research is needed to improve mental health professionals' ability to identify sexually abused children who are at high risk for psychopathology. 61 references and 1 table. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         sexual abuse;  psychopathology;  predictor variables;  sequelae;  posttraumatic stress disorder;  depression;  child behavior;  child abuse research

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    General Practitioners and Child Protection Case Conference Participation: Reasons for Non-Attendance and Proposals For a Way Forward.

 

AUTHOR:               Polnay, J. C.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Abuse Review

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Nottingham City Hospital (United Kingdom).

 

SOURCE:                9(2): pp. 108-123;  John Wiley and Sons, Ltd., Chichester, West Sussex (United Kingdom)., 2000;  p. 448

 

ABSTRACT:           General practitioners' (GPs) attitudes about child protection case conferences were explored in the belief that commonly cited practical reasons, such as inconvenient timing, fail to provide a complete explanation for poor participation. Twelve GPs took part in a preliminary investigation by telephone interview and a postal questionnaire was then sent to 112 GPs in the Nottingham area. The response rate was 100 percent for the preliminary study and 82 percent for the questionnaire. The postal survey showed that nearly half the respondents agreed there were too many other tasks of higher priority than case conference attendance, confirming that previously mentioned constraints alone did not account for poor participation. Contrary to previous research, issues such as confidentiality and parental attendance do not stop the majority of GPs from contributing. Suggestions that might improve participation, such as facility to stay for the first half hour of a conference and guidance on content of reports, had favorable responses. It was concluded that it may be more fruitful to concentrate on improving report submission rate and content because of GPs' priorities. Improved education of GPs and social workers with respect to each other's role and responsibilities would facilitate communication in case conferences. 25 references and 8 tables. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         physicians role;  child protection;  multidisciplinary teams;  physicians attitudes;  case plans;  great britain;  child welfare research

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.wiley.com

 

 

TITLE:                    Specialized Assessments For Children in Foster Care.

 

AUTHOR:               Horwitz, S. M.;  Owens, P.;  Simms, M. D.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Pediatrics

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Yale Univ., New Haven, CT. Dept. of Epidemiology and Public Health.

 

SOURCE:                106(1): pp. 59-66;  American Academy of Pediatrics, Elks Grove Village, IL., July 2000;  p. 454

 

ABSTRACT:           A two-group quasi-experimental design was used to investigate the differences in health problems identified and health services received by 62 children entering foster care who participated in a comprehensive multidisciplinary program, and 58 children who received customary community-based services. Data were collected during interviews with foster parents, complete medical examinations, and a battery of developmental, psychological, speech/language, and motor assessment for each childat baseline and in follow-up assessments at 6 and 12 months. No significant differences between the two groups were found in medical, educational, developmental, or mental health problems identified by foster mothers. However, children in the intervention group were more likely to be identified with developmental and mental health problems by providers than children in the comparison group. Children in the intervention group were also more likely to be referred for health services at baselineand receive follow-up care at 6 and 12 months of age than children in the comparison group. Findings indicated that community providers identify medical and educational needs but do not recognize developmental and mental health needs of young children newly entering foster care. The discrepancies in the number of recommended services and follow-up care between the two groups make a case for the establishment of specialized services for children entering out-of-home care. 36 references and 6 tables. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         foster children;  health services;  intervention strategies;  early intervention programs;  medical evaluation;  identification;  diagnoses;  child welfare research

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.pediatrics.org

 

 

TITLE:                    Questioning the Child Witness: What Can We Conclude From the Research Thus Far?

 

AUTHOR:               Quas, J. A.;  Goodman, G. S.;  Ghetti, S.;  Redlich, A. D.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Trauma, Violence, and Abuse

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    California Univ., Irvine. Dept. of Psychology and Social Behavior.

 

SOURCE:                1(3): pp. 223-249;  Sage Publications Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA., July 2000;  p. 461

 

ABSTRACT:           In recent years increasing numbers of studies have investigated children's memory, suggestibility, and false event reports. This article highlights key findings from and implications of this research for interviewing child witnesses. First, developmental changes in children s memory and suggestibility are discussed, spanning from the early childhood years through middle childhood, suggesting that the most consistent and robust predictor of differences in children's performance is age. Second, theory and research concerning relations between emotional distress and children's memory are reviewed, with an emphasis on methodological differences that have led to varied results across studies and sheds light on the degree to which emotional distress helps versus hinders children ' memory and suggestibility. Third is a description of factors associated with the context of an interview that may influence children's susceptibility to false suggestions, in particular discussing the implications of questioning tactics and contextual features of forensic interviews. Fourth, recent studies are discussed concerning individual differences in children's mnemonic capabilities, suggestibility, and false memories. Finally, recommendations are provided about what can and cannot be concluded from research on questioning child witnesses, with an eye on aiding professionals in understanding the research and its capabilities and limitations. Numerous references. (Author abstract modified.)

 

KEY TERMS:         child witnesses;  research;  false allegations;  memory;  suggestibility;  stress;  risk factors;  literature review

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.sagepub.com/

 

 

TITLE:                    Cultural Strengths and Challenges in Implementing a System of Care Model in American Indian Communities.

 

AUTHOR:               Cross, T. L.;  Earle, K.;  Solie, H. E. H.;  Manness, K.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    National Indian Child Welfare Association, Portland, OR.

 

SOURCE:                Volume 1. American Institutes for Research, Washington, DC. Center for Effective Collaboration and Practice., 2000;  p. 470

 

ABSTRACT:           Reports show that mental health services for American Indian children are inadequate even though Indian children are known to have more serious mental health problems than all other ethnic groups in the United States. This monograph examines five American Indian children's mental health projects funded by the Center for Mental Health Services. The goal of the projects was to examine promising practice that implements traditional American Indian helping and healing methods that are rooted in their culture, and represents the strength and challenges of community-based service designs that draw on culture as a primary resource. Pertinent literature is reviewed, suggesting that the American Indian sites described here are not alone intheir pursuit of culturally based mental health methods. As a framework, the authors use the relational model often associated with the medicine wheel based on the traditional American Indian worldview. It describes mental health as a balance among context, mind, body, and spirit. Data from four of the five sites were obtained from focus groups and key informant interviews; data from the other site were gathered from written materials. In reviewing the responses of each site, several recurring themes were identified; those themes revealed 18 identifiable promising practices that address the integration of culture as a resource for helping children and their families. Conclusions suggest that these community based, culturally rooted programs, with 24-hour wraparound service availability, result in substantial cost savings by preventing more costly out-of-home services. Numerous references; two appendixes.

 

KEY TERMS:         american indians;  cultural values;  barriers;  program models;  grants;  mental health;  wraparound services;  community based services

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Technical Report

 

INTERNET URL:   http://cecp.air.org/

 

 

TITLE:                    Using Evaluation Data to Manage, Improve, Market, and Sustain Children's Services.

 

AUTHOR:               Woodbridge, M. W.;  Huang, L. N.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC. National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health.

 

SOURCE:                Volume 2. American Institutes for Research, Washington, DC. Center for Effective Collaboration and Practice., 2000;  p. 471

 

ABSTRACT:           Providers and evaluators of mental health services to children and their families are often challenged by the task of translating evaluation findings into clear and meaningful reports that can illustrate the resources, gaps, expenditures, and outcomes of their programs. This monograph describes promising practices in the use of evaluation data at cites funded by the federal Center for Mental Health Services as part of the Comprehensive Community Mental Health Services for Children and their Families Program. The sites showcased in the monograph have developed and implemented programs for at least five years as a requirement of their federal funding. These sites have been deemed successful in going beyond their funding obligations to become true data-driven systems committed to gauging the effectiveness of their local services through data analysis, instilling timely and consistent evaluation feedback mechanisms into their practices, and responding to evaluation findings with data-based decision making and system improvements. The research questions focused on the experiences of multiple stakeholders with reporting and utilizing evaluation data. Analysis of the interviews and evaluation products in the sites reveal patterns in the establishment of support for evaluation and the use of data. Recurring techniques to garner buy-in from multiple stakeholders and establish an evaluation culture. Results of the study indicate that the utility and effectiveness of evaluation feedback is intricately tied to the comprehensiveness and complexity of the service delivery system; the integration of the evaluation program with service delivery; the quality of the management information system in place; and the political climate supporting child and family services. Twenty-two exhibits; numerous references. Two appendixes.

 

KEY TERMS:         evaluation methods;  data analysis;  childrens services;  service delivery;  grants;  outcomes;  mental health;  community based services

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Technical Report

 

INTERNET URL:   http://cecp.air.org/

 

 

TITLE:                    Thinking Clearly About Evaluations of Suspected Child Abuse.

 

AUTHOR:               Leventhal, J. M.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Yale Univ., New Haven, CT. Dept. of Pediatrics.

 

SOURCE:                5(1): pp. 139-147;  Sage Publications, Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA., 2000;  p. 481

 

ABSTRACT:           Challenges face professionals who determine whether an injury in a young child is due to child abuse. Although much has been written about the types of injuries that are due to abuse, little information is available about the processes of gathering data and making clinical decisions. This article describes an approach to providing effective evaluations and offers 14 suggestions focused on the process of conducting an evaluation and eight focused on decision-making. The 14 suggestions for conducting an evaluation are as follows: 1. Clarify who you are (so that parents understand why you are conducting the evaluation. 2. Arrange to have another clinician present at the interview of the parents. 3. Consider separate interviews of the parents, to get the parents' views of each other. 4. Listen to the parents' whole story. 5. Determine who was actually present at the time of the injury. 6. Ask helpful questions designed to provide answers about the parents' relationship. 7. Observe theeffect of the questions on the behavior of parents. 8. Do not ignore the parent-child relationship. 9. A single history can be repeated five times in the record. 10. Review the x-rays with the attending radiologist. 11. Talk to the primary care clinician, who may know the family well. 12. Meet with the clinicians caring for the child and other consultants. 13. Keep the parents informed. 14. Do not ignore your own feelings or those of your colleagues or staff. The eight suggestions for decision-making are as follows: 1. Minor injuries in children are common, and not necessarily indications of abuse. 2. Unusual events do happen to children, so automatically disbelieving a story because it seems strange may not be the correct path. 3. Others are often present when an accident occurs. 4. Be worried about abuse when others are being blamed for causing the injuries. 5. Be worried about abuse when the father cares for the child alone. 6. Be cautious when there is an underlying medical problem, noting that pediatricians often make a single diagnosis whenever possible. 7. Pay attention to the history so that the details are understood and to the injuries because sometimes the words lie. 8. You cannot be right every time. Eight references.

 

KEY TERMS:         child abuse;  evaluation methods;  decision making;  injuries;  clinical methods training;  guidelines;  child protective services;  professionals role

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.sagepub.com/

 

 

TITLE:                    The Abuse-Perpetration Inventory: Development of an Assessment Instrument For Research on the Cycle of Violence.

 

AUTHOR:               Lisak, D.;  Conklin, A.;  Hopper, J.;  Miller, P.;  et al.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Family Violence and Sexual Assault Bulletin

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Massachusetts Univ., Boston. Dept. of Psychology.

 

SOURCE:                16(1-2): pp. 21-30;  Family Violence and Sexual Assault Institute, San Diego, CA., Spring-Summer 2000;  p. 491

 

ABSTRACT:           Research on the generational cycle of family violence is hampered by significant methodological difficulties intrinsic to family violence research. The authors note that the vast majority of both child abuse and interpersonally violent acts are never reported, leave no archival trace, and involve only two witnesses, the victim and the perpetrator. Thus, research on the cycle of violence requires development of valid, self-report assessments of both childhood abuse and of perpetration behaviors. This article details the development of an abuse-perpetration inventory, a comprehensive self-report instrument that assesses childhood sexual and physical abuse as well as four types of perpetration in male subjects. The validity of the instrument has been demonstrated through follow-up interviews that indicate high cross-method concordance rates, and the results of six studies in which abuse and perpetration have been associated with theoretically predicted outcomes. One recommendationdictates that research on the hidden nature of this type of violence exploring the link between victimization and perpetration must ultimately rely on the self-reports of participation, which in turn dictate the need for thorough and well-validated, self-administered assessment instruments. Three tables; numerous references. (Author abstract modified.)

 

KEY TERMS:         generational cycle of family violence;  child abuse;  perpetrators;  research;  self report inventories;  followup studies;  predictor variables;  outcomes

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.fvsai.org/

 

 

TITLE:                    Attachment Disorder Behavior Following Early Severe Deprivation: Extension and Longitudinal Follow-Up.

 

AUTHOR:               O'Connor, T. G.;  Rutter, M.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Institute of Psychiatry, London (England).

 

SOURCE:                39(6): pp. 703-712;  Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, Hagerstown, MD., June 2000;  p. 497

 

ABSTRACT:           The objective of this article is to examine attachment disturbances and disorder in a longitudinal study of children adopted in the United Kingdom following severe early privation and in comparative sample of non-deprived, +; within-country, early-placed adoptees. The study involved 165 children adopted from Romania and 52 children from the United Kingdom, who were assessed at age 6. Longitudinal data (at ages 4 and 6) were available on 111 Romanian adoptees placed in U.K. +; homes before 24 months of age and on all U.K. adoptees. Information on attachment disorder was derived from a semi-structured interview with the parent; in addition, data on children's cognitive and social development were assessed using standardized +; assessments. Analyses revealed a close association between the duration of deprivation and severity of attachment disorder behaviors. In addition, attachment disorder behaviors were correlated with attentional and conduct problems and cognitive level but+; nonetheless appeared to indicate a distinct set of symptoms and behaviors. There was also marked stability in individual differences in attachment disorder behaviors and little evidence of a mean decrease over this two-year period. The findings offer +; construct validation for the attachment disorder construct and highlight critical and conceptual questions that require further research. Three tables; two figures; 28 references. (Author abstract modified.)

 

KEY TERMS:         attachment disorder;  child behavior;  deprivation;  longitudinal studies;  data collection;  data analysis;  united kingdom;  romania

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    Assessing Children's Experiences of Out-of-Home Care: Methodological Challenges and

 

AUTHOR:               Berrick, J. D.;  Frasch, K.;  Fox, A.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Social Work Research

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    California Univ., Berkeley. School of Social Welfare.

 

SOURCE:                24(2): pp. 119-127;  National Association of Social Workers, Inc., Washington, DC., June 2000;  p. 499

 

ABSTRACT:           The U.S. foster care system has undergone profound changes over the past decade, with caseload growth, increases in the number of very young children entering care, and problematic behaviors among some children. This article discusses +; some of the methodological issues raised in a study conducted in California. The sample included 100 children ages 6 to 13 residing in kinship or non-kinship care for a minimum of six months. The study used face-to-face interviews with the children in +; the homes of their caregivers and was built on the previous work by the investigator, which also involved interviews with the children's kin and non-kin foster parents. From the interviews, three challenges emerged in conducting research with children in+; foster care: 1) the recruitment of the study sample; 2) development of the study instrument; and 3) selection and training of interviewers. Potentially problematic methodological concerns are highlighted, and a variety of strategies to minimize their +; effect are suggested. Conclusions support the importance of working collaboratively with social services agencies and the courts to overcome some of the obstacles faced in research of foster care. Techniques must be devised and defined to gain access to +; children in care and to incorporate their perspectives into the research enterprise. Twenty-four references.

 

KEY TERMS:         out-of-home care;  foster care;  behavior problems;  kinship care;  service delivery;  research methodology;  california;  data analysis

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.naswpress.org

 

 

TITLE:                    Expenditures on Children by Families: 1999 Annual Report.

 

INST. AUTHOR:    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC. Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

SOURCE:                Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC. Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion., March 2000;  p. 507

 

ABSTRACT:           The U.S. Department of Agriculture provides this 1999 technical report on estimates of annual expenditures on children from birth through age 17. Expenditures estimated in the study are composed of direct parental expenses for seven +; budgetary components: housing, food, transportation, clothing, health care, childcare, and miscellaneous goods and services. Data used to estimate expenditures on children are from the 1990-1992 Consumer Expenditure Survey Interview portion. The sample +; consisted of 12,850 husband-wife households and 3,395 single parent households. Multivariate analysis was used to estimate household and child-specific expenditures, controlling for income level, family size, and age of the younger child. All data were +; converted to 1999 dollars. For two-child, husband-wife households, estimated expenses varied considerably by household income level. Housing accounted for the largest share across income groups, ranging from 33 percent to 37 percent of expenses; food was+; the second-largest average expense, accounting for 15-20 percent of child-rearing expenses. In single-family households, child-rearing expenses were similar, but the primary difference was that the majority of single-parent households are in lower +; income groups; also, in single-parent households with two children, about 7 percent less is spent on the older child than on the younger child. Eleven tables; 17 references; two appendixes.

 

KEY TERMS:         federal government;  expenditures;  data collection;  data analysis;  foster care;  state programs;  subsidies;  families

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Technical Report

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.usda.gov/cnpp/

 

 

TITLE:                    Ethnicity and Placement: Beginning the Debate.

 

AUTHOR:               Small, J.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Adoption and Fostering

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    West Indies Univ., Jamaica.

 

SOURCE:                24(1): pp. 9-14;  British Agencies for Adoption and Fostering, London (England)., Spring 2000;  p. 520

 

ABSTRACT:           This article is based on an interview with John Small, a lecturer in social work at the University of the West Indies, Jamaica, on the importance of racial identity and the value of placements with black caretakers. The interview +; examines racial identity issues, discussing psychological research that shows what constitutes self and how self-image is derivative of the messages obtained from others. Identity issues in Jamaica are discussed, noting that there, unlike the United +; Kingdom, the population has generally overcome psychological messages based on colonial rule that tout the superiority of whites and the inferiority of blacks. The merits of placements with black caretakers and white caretakers are discussed, noting that+; white families are generally not equipped to understand the history and conditions of blacks in the United Kingdom. The reluctance in the U.K. to place black children with black caretakers is examined, suggesting that racism, personal agendas, and fear +; and guilt play major roles. Small suggests that the way forward is multifaceted, requiring recruitment of black workers, panel members, and caretakers, with black and white social workers working together for institutional and political change, both to +; improve placement practice and to eliminate racism. The restating of the original concepts that fueled the placement of some black children with black caretakers both sets the record straight and provides a basis for widening the debate. Ten +; references.

 

KEY TERMS:         ethnic identity;  child placement;  transracial adoption;  social worker role;  united kingdom;  jamaica;  racism;  recruitment

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.baaf.org.uk

 

 

TITLE:                    Representing Parents in Child Welfare Cases: A Basic Introduction For Attorneys.

 

AUTHOR:               Rauber, D. B.;  Granik, L. A.;  Laver, M. R. (Editor)

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Law Office of Wildhaber and Associates.

 

SOURCE:                American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law, Washington, DC. National Child Welfare Resource Center on Legal and Judicial Issues., 2000;  p. 541

 

ABSTRACT:           These guidelines provide a basic introduction to the legal representation of parents during child protection proceedings. Attorneys for parents must defer to their clients for major decisions, but are required to review all relevant +; alternatives and related consequences. Representation is most effective when the attorney seeks to be cooperative with the child welfare agency, rather than obstruct their treatment attempts. This strategy is especially important to resolve cases within +; the current timeframes mandated by the Adoption and Safe Families Act. American Bar Association Model Rules state that attorneys must conduct a comprehensive investigation, conduct a formal discovery when necessary, interview and compel appropriate +; witnesses, and continue until the case is resolved. The booklet outlines the specific responsibilities during the pre-trial independent investigation, emergency removal hearing, alternative dispute resolution, adjudication, disposition, review hearings, +; permanency hearings, termination of parental rights, and appeal. An extensive list of resources for more information is also provided. 1 figure.

 

KEY TERMS:         lawyers role;  lawyers responsibility;  parental advocacy;  hearings;  permanency hearings;  legal processes;  alternative dispute resolution;  guidelines

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Book

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.abanet.org/

 

 

TITLE:                    Relationship to Perpetrator and Posttraumatic Symptomatology Among Sexual Abuse Survivors.

 

AUTHOR:               Lucenko, B. A.;  Gold, S. N.;  Cott, M. A.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Journal of Family Violence

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Nova Southeastern Univ., Fort Lauderdale, FL. Center for Psychological Studies.

 

SOURCE:                15(2): pp. 169-179;  Kluwer Academic-Plenum Publishing, Dordrecht (The Netherlands)., June 2000;  p. 557

 

ABSTRACT:           This study investigated the association of several dimensions of relationship to perpetrator of childhood sexual abuse to posttraumatic symptomatology in adulthood. A structured clinical interview, the Impact of Event scale, and the +; TSC-40 were administered to 67 women survivors seeking psychotherapy. The t-tests for significant differences indicated that subjects whose perpetrators were not caretakers experienced higher levels of posttraumatic symptomatology (PTS) in adulthood than+; those abused by caretakers. No significant differences were found in traumatic symptomatology between those whose perpetrators were family members and those whose perpetrators were not or between those abused by someone in the home and those abused by +; someone outside the household. Implications for future research and clinical practice are explored. 30 references and 2 tables. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         sexual abuse;  adults abused as children;  sequelae;  posttraumatic stress disorder;  symptoms;  incest;  characteristics of abuser;  child abuse research

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.wkap.nl

 

 

TITLE:                    Grandparent Caregivers' Perception of the Stress of Surrogate Parenting.

 

AUTHOR:               Sands, R. G.;  Goldberg-Glen, R. S.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Journal of Social Service Research

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Pennsylvania Univ., Phildelphia. School of Social Work.

 

SOURCE:                26(3): pp. 77-95;  Haworth Press, Inc., Binghamton, NY., 2000;  p. 558

 

ABSTRACT:           This paper examined the relationship between sociodemographic factors, stressors, and resources, and the perception of stress by grandparents caring for their grandchildren. A sample of 129 grandparents had face-to-face interviews. A +; hierarchical block regression analysis produced a model that accounted for 49 percent of the variance. For the first block (sociodemographic factors) younger age and being white were significant, but in the context of the second block, these variables +; disappeared and being employed, having conflict with the children's parent, and grandchild problems were significant. The final block, in which resources were added, found that being employed, having conflict with the children's parent, grandchild +; problems, and lack of family resources were associated with high perception of stress. These findings suggest strategies for social work intervention. 37 references and 3 tables. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         grandparents;  kinship care;  parental stress;  family characteristics;  child welfare research;  parental surrogates;  stress;  demography

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.haworthpressinc.com

 

 

TITLE:                    Fetal Alcohol Exposure and Adult Psychopathology: Evidence From an Adoption Study.

 

AUTHOR:               Cadoret, R. J.;  Riggins-Caspers, K.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Dept. of Psychiatry.

 

SOURCE:                In: Barth, R. P.; Freundlich, M.; and Brodzinsky, D. (Editors). Adoption and Prenatal Alcohol and Drug Exposure: Research, Policy, and Practice. Child Welfare League of America,, 2000;  p. 608

 

ABSTRACT:           The relationship between fetal alcohol exposure and adult psychopathology was explored in a comparison of 95 adopted adults whose birth parents were classified as antisocial or addicted to drugs or alcohol and 102 adopted adults withoutsuch family history. Measures included case record review for prenatal fetal alcohol exposure and birth parent psychopathology, and interviews with adopted families about home factors and adoptee behavior. The findings revealed that prenatal alcohol exposure was significantly related to adult psychopathology, even after controlling for adverse adoptive home environments, prenatal environmental risk, and other genetic factors. Adoptees with a history of prenatal alcohol exposure and adverse adoptive home environments were found to have two or three times as many psychiatric symptoms as other adoptees. The symptoms most often included substance abuse, antisocial personality, anxiety disorders, depression, and personality disorder. These findings are consistent with the results of two previous research studies. Limitations of the project are reviewed. 39 references, 6 figures, and 4 tables.

 

KEY TERMS:         alcohol related birth disorders;  fetal alcohol effect;  fetal alcohol syndrome;  lifelong impact;  psychopathology;  adopted children;  adopted adults;  risk factors

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Chapter in Book

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.cwla.org

 

 

TITLE:                    Using a Microanalysis of a Videotaped Interview to Understand the Dynamics of a Grandparent-Headed Household.

 

AUTHOR:               Sands, R. G.;  Goldberg-Glen, R. S.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia. School of Social Work.

 

SOURCE:                In: Hayslip, B.; Goldberg-Glen, R. (Editors). Grandparents Raising Grandchildren: Theoretical, Empirical and Clinical Perspectives. Springer Publishing Co., Inc., New York, NY., 2000;  p. 626

 

ABSTRACT:           A microanalysis conducted of an interview in which a custodial grandmother revealed that her husband is the father of one of her grandchildren reveals clues about the grandmother's state of mind and her feelings about caregiving. Researchers performed the microanalysis by reviewing a videotape of the interview and noting the verbal as well as nonverbal responses of the grandmother and the interviewer. In a previous survey, the interviewee had expressed her displeasure with the custodial role. The microanalysis provided the reasons for her attitude by finding that she referred to the child as that instead of he and that the woman was previously avoiding questions about her relationship with her husband. These findings indicate that follow-up interviews may be needed to obtain more in-depth information than can be collected in a written questionnaire. In addition, interviewers should be trained to read clues that an interviewee is protecting some key information about the family. 22 references and 2 tables.

 

KEY TERMS:         kinship care;  grandparents;  interviews;  qualitative research;  videotaping;  research methodology;  data analysis;  disclosure

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Chapter in Book

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.springerpub.com

 

 

TITLE:                    Global Connections: A Passport Home. Adoption for U.S. Citizens Living Abroad.

 

INST. AUTHOR:    Voice for International Development and Adoption, Hudson, NY;  Adoption Exchange, Denver, CO.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

SOURCE:                Adoption Exchange, Aurora, CO., 2000;  p. 652

 

ABSTRACT:           Domestic and intercountry adoptions by United States citizens living abroad are more complicated because of their distance from domestic adoption agencies and the documentation required for adopting a child from a non-U.S. country. Thisguide describes all aspects of the adoption processes in these situations, from conducting research about adoption to the finalization of the placement. The selection of an adoption agency, application, home study, referral, parenting issues, documentation, and costs are discussed. The guide also reviews immigration and citizenship issues for intercountry adoptions. Resources and case studies of successful adoptions by U.S. citizens living abroad are included.

 

KEY TERMS:         intercountry adoption;  adoption guides;  adoption process;  adoption preparation;  interviews;  home study;  military adoption;  citizenship

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Booklet

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.adoptex.org

 

 

TITLE:                    An Exploration of Counselling Identity in Counsellors Who Deal With Trauma.

 

AUTHOR:               Black, S.;  Weinreich, P.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Traumatology

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Ulster Univ., Newtonabbey (North Ireland).

 

SOURCE:                6(1): pp. 1-13;  Green Cross Foundation, Tallahassee, FL., 2000;  p. 677

 

ABSTRACT:           This research explored some of the ways in which counselors construct their identity when, in the aftermath of a traumatic event, they are exposed to the trauma of their clients. The research investigated the impact of counseling traumatized victims and the possible resulting experience of vicarious traumatization on the sense of identity on those counselors using Identity Structure Analysis. Semi-structured informal interviews together with IDEX (Identity Exploration for Windows, V3.0) were used to analyze the issues of the impact of vicarious traumatization on respondents interpersonal relationships, the reverberation between previous traumatic experiences on current therapeutic practice, and how the respondents professional orientation with regard to belief and value systems was influenced upon exposure to the trauma of their clients. The results show that vicarious traumatization has a marked impact on both empathetic and conflicted identifications, that previous traumatic experiences have both positive and negative influences on current therapeutic practice, and that counselors are likely to experience shifts in their belief and value systems as a consequence of trauma s after-shocks. The results have implications for the caring professions, counselors who are involved in trauma work, and managers who have responsibility for the supervision and care of trauma counselors. 31 references and 5 tables. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         counselors;  worker client relationships;  identity;  identity development;  trauma;  sequelae;  psychologists attitudes;  therapists

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.fsu.edu/~trauma/

 

 

TITLE:                    Adoption With Contact: A Study of Adoptive Parents and the Impact of Continuing Contact With Families of Origin.

 

AUTHOR:               Sykes, M.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Adoption and Fostering

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Wiltshire Mental Health Care NHS Trust (United Kingdom).

 

SOURCE:                24(2): pp. 20-32;  British Agencies for Adoption and Fostering, London (United Kingdom)., 2000;  p. 735

 

ABSTRACT:           Adoption practice in the 1990s has seen a substantial increase in adoptive families where there continues to be contact with families of origin. This study examines the impact of contact experiences for adoptive parents at least two years after placement. Thirty adoptive parents in 17 families completed a written questionnaire about their experience and about half of the respondents were interviewed for more information. The analysis of the narratives from the interviews considered the impact on parenthood, specifically themes of control, entitlement to parent, communication, bonding, and ownership, as well as the relationships between adoptive and birth parents. The findings suggest that the passage of time and a greater sense of control assist in establishing confidence, while adopters develop a more empathic view towards birth mothers. This has emotional costs to the adoptive mother. The study suggests that contact is more likely to be sustained where adoptive parents are able to develop a coherence in their understanding of their own past experiences. The implications for practice are discussed. 43 references. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         adoption research;  post adoption contact;  open adoption;  sequelae;  birth mothers;  visitation;  emotional response;  parental attitudes

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.baaf.org.uk

 

 

TITLE:                    Early Sexual Abuse and Lifetime Psychopathology: A Co-Twin-Control Study.

 

AUTHOR:               Dinwiddie, S.;  Heath, A. C.;  Dunne, M. P.;  Bucholz, K. K.;  et al.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Psychological Medicine

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Finch Univ., North Chicago, IL. Dept. of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.

 

SOURCE:                30(1): pp. 41-52;  Cambridge Univ. Press, Oxford (United Kingdom)., 2000;  p. 748

 

ABSTRACT:           This study was designed to determine lifetime prevalence of psychiatric disorders among twins who reported childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and to compare these rates with those among non-abused co-twins. The contribution of familial and individual-specific factors to reported sexual abuse was also examined. Information about lifetime psychopathology and substance use was obtained by structured telephone interviews with 5,995 Australian twins. Twins who reported a history of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) were contrasted on lifetime psychopathology with subjects without such as history; in addition, comparisons were made between same-sex twin pairs discordant for CSA. A history of CSA was reported by 5.9 percent of the women and 2.5 percent of the men. In the sample as a whole, those reporting CSA were more likely to receive lifetime diagnoses of major depression, conduct disorder, panic disorder, and alcoholism, and were more likely to report suicidal ideation and a history of suicide attempt. Abused women, but not men, were also more likely to report social phobia. When comparisons were restricted to non-abused co-twins, no differences in psychopathology were seen. However, rates of major depression, conduct disorder and suicidal ideation were higher if both co-twins were abused than if the respondent alone reported CSA. Model-fitting indicated that shared environmental factors influenced risk for reported CSA in women, but not in men. The association between CSA and psychopathology arises at least in part through the influence of shared familial factors on both risk of victimization and risk of psychopathology. 48 references, 1 figure, and 6 tables. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         twin studies;  sexual abuse;  adults abused as children;  sequelae;  psychopathology;  mental disorders;  risk factors;  child abuse research

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.cup.org

 

 

TITLE:                    Abuse and Neglect of Children With Disabilities: A Collaborative Response. A Curriculum for Parents, Educators, Law Enforcement and Child Protective Services.

 

AUTHOR:               O'Neill, P.;  Purcell, P.;  Orelove, F.;  Shelton, J.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond. Partners Protecting Children With Disabilities From Abuse and Neglect.

 

SOURCE:                Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond. Partners Protecting Children With Disabilities From Abuse and Neglect., October 2000;  p. 780

 

ABSTRACT:           This curriculum contains trainer's instructions and participant handouts for a training program designed to promote collaboration among parents, educators, and investigators for the prevention and identification of the abuse and neglectof children with disabilities. The two-day program reviews the prevalence of risk factors for abuse and neglect and strategies for responding to suspicions of maltreatment. Communication skills are emphasized in breakout sessions for investigators (child protective services and law enforcement professionals) and educators and parents. Specific topics include person-first language in references to individuals with disabilities; the emotional needs of children with disabilities; cultural issues; consequences of maltreatment; medical conditions that produce symptoms similar to abuse and neglect; the dynamics of abuse and neglect; association between child maltreatment and domestic violence; community resources; responsibilities of mandated reporters; reporting procedures; resiliency skills training; positive behavioral support techniques; developmentally appropriate interview strategies; and considerations for determining competency for testimony.

 

KEY TERMS:         professional training;  curricula;  children with disabilities;  interagency collaboration;  child protective services;  police training;  school personnel;  parent education

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Training Material

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.vcu.edu/vidd/

 

 

TITLE:                    The Kempe Family Stress Inventory: A Review.

 

AUTHOR:               Korfmacher, J.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Abuse and Neglect

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Colorado Univ. School of Medicine, Denver. Kempe Children's Center.

 

SOURCE:                24(1): pp. 129-140;  Elsevier Science Ltd., New York, NY., January 2000

 

ABSTRACT:           This article reviews research about the validity of the Kempe Family Stress Inventory (KFSI), a 10-item scale that measures risk for parenting difficulties based upon responses to a thorough psychosocial interview. Research and documentation regarding the assessment instrument were gathered from journals, book chapters, presentations, workshops, and intervention evaluation reports. The KFSI has been used to predict parents' future risk of maltreating their children. The scale covers a variety of domains, including psychiatric history, criminal and substance abuse history, childhood history of care, emotional functioning, attitudes towards and perception of child, discipline of child, and level of stress in the parent's life. Although construct validity has been demonstrated with the KFSI, questions remain about its specificity and sensitivity. In addition, there has been minimal reliability and work done on the measure. It is concluded that the KFSI may have clinical utility, but should be used as part of a more comprehensive risk assessment that includes multiple measures. Acceptable accuracy in predicting child abuse and neglect when used by itself has not been demonstrated. There is a need for more demonstration of reliability and validity. Suggestions for future research are noted. 21 references and 2 tables. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         assessment;  measures;  parental stress;  parental behavior;  validity;  adults abused as children;  substance abuse;  mental health

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    Client Evaluation of a Consultation Team on Crimes Against Children.

 

AUTHOR:               Bross, D. C.;  Ballo, N.;  Korfmacher, J.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Abuse and Neglect

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Colorado Univ. School of Medicine, Denver. Dept. of Pediatrics.

 

SOURCE:                24(1): pp. 71-84;  Elsevier Science Ltd., New York, NY., January 2000

 

ABSTRACT:           Cases of child abuse filed in court as crimes against children represent a small percentage of the total number of children maltreated. However, studying child maltreatment crimes is important to assure that these cases are managed well. Forensic consultation teams can perform several functions related to child abuse crimes: provide multidisciplinary expertise in the evaluation of maltreatment cases; offer a method for allocating resources between cases managed by the criminal justice and child protection systems; and provide important research and teaching opportunities. This study reviews the role played by multidisciplinary team consultations based on the perception of client professionals whose agencies pay for an outside consulting forensic team. Professionals referring to a forensic team for consultative assistance were asked to evaluate the service during telephone interviews, responding to both structured and unstructured questions. Eighteen responding professionals stated that the team increased their confidence that the approach being taken to a case was correct (94 percent), that missing expertise was provided (100 percent), that progress was made in cases that might otherwise not have been made (55 percent), and that ambiguity was reduced (in 83 percent of referred cases). Using the team sometimes caused delays. Some delays were unacceptable administrative delays while others were considered necessary to assure completeness of the evaluation. The use of the team did not result in resolution of all the cases referred, but referral to the team consistently provided closure for referring professionals. In one-third of the cases studied, if it had not been for the State and Regional Team (START) consultation, the cases would not have proceeded to an appropriate criminal or civil resolution. 3 tables and numerous references. (Author abstract modified)

 

KEY TERMS:         evaluation;  multidisciplinary teams;  criminal charges;  criminal justice system;  child protective services;  consultation;  interviews

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    Extrafamilial Sexual Abuse: Treatment for Child Victims and Their Families.

 

AUTHOR:               Grosz, C. A.;  Kempe, R. S.;  Kelly, M.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Abuse and Neglect

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Colorado Univ. School of Medicine, Denver. Dept. of Pediatrics.

 

SOURCE:                24(1): pp. 9-23;  Elsevier Science Ltd., New York, NY., January 2000

 

ABSTRACT:           This study was designed to decrease the emotional distress of child victims of extrafamilial sexual abuse (ESA) and their families. The study provided crisis intervention, individual and group treatment in response to an expressed need in the community, and piloted the use of group treatment for child victims of ESA under age 10. This paper describes interventions with a sample of 246 child victims, ages 2 to 14 years, and 323 parents who participated in the program from 1984 to 1991. This pilot program, the Recovery for Children and Parents, (ReCAP) operated at the Kempe National Center, University of Colorado School of Medicine, and was located off campus in an outpatient child abuse center. Priority was given to child victims under age 7. Child victims and their families were evaluated after investigative interviews by law enforcement agencies were completed. A treatment plan was developed based on clinical assessment. Families participated in crisis counseling, individual treatment for the child victim and/or parent, children's treatment groups, parent support groups, or were referred to other resources. Clinical assessment of treatment progress included weekly case review by child and parent therapists, video analysis and observation of children's treatment group sessions, consultation with parents, and collateral contacts. A family approach and services for parents in addition to intervention for child victims were determined to be key components in facilitating recovery. Clinical observations and client feedback showed positive outcomes for child victims and parents in crisis counseling, children's treatment groups, and parent support groups. The extent of intervention ranged from 1 session to 24 months with an average participation of 6 to 9 months. Followup surveys were returned by parents for 48 child victims and results are reported. Themes, parallels in responses, and recovery factors for child victims and parents are discussed. The need for intervention and a community-based program was demonstrated by the significant disruption in functioning that occurred for child victims of ESA and their families; the risk for long term sequelae, the high incidence of extrafamilial sexual abuse, and the consistent, large number of requests for services. Family-centered crisis services, children's treatment groups, and parent support groups can be effectively based at child advocacy centers, outpatient care clinics, or other community agencies. The results of formal outcome measures and longitudinal studies is needed to determine how child victims and parents benefit from specific treatment modalities and to better guide the use of limited resources. 10 tables and numerous references. (Author abstract modified)

 

KEY TERMS:         sexual abuse;  group therapy;  support groups;  family therapy;  individual therapy;  colorado;  pilot programs;  sequelae

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    Supervised Visitation: The Families and Their Experiences.

 

AUTHOR:               Pearson, J.;  Thoennes, N.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Family and Conciliation Courts Review

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Center for Policy Research, Denver, CO.

 

SOURCE:                38(1): pp. 123-142;  Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, CA., January 2000

 

ABSTRACT:           Data were collected from reviews of 676 case files and interviews with 201 participating parents to provide a profile of families receiving supervised visitation services, their experiences, and the outcomes from one of four programs. Findings indicate that the visitation programs successfully serve a wide variety of families and garner high ratings of user satisfaction, but half of the families exit without formal closure. Families that drop out receive fewer court hearings and evaluations for the problems that brought them into the programs in the first place, suggesting that they may feel neglected. In most cases that formally exit the program, the visitation situation improves over time, although interviewed parents give mixed reports about their visitation situations after they leave the programs. 13 references and 11 tables. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         visitation;  family services;  family characteristics;  outcomes;  program evaluation;  model programs;  foster care;  family reunification

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.sagepub.com/

 

 

TITLE:                    Factors Associated With Stress Among Grandparents Raising Their Grandchildren.

 

AUTHOR:               Sands, R. G.;  Goldberg-Glen, R. S.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Family Relations

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia. School of Social Work.

 

SOURCE:                49(1): pp. 97-105;  National Council on Family Relations, Minneapolis, MN., January 2000

 

ABSTRACT:           This cross-sectional study of 129 grandparents raising their grandchildren examined the extent to which social supports are related to the grandparents' stress (psychological anxiety). The sample included 129 grandparents consisting of 32 African American and 32 white middle aged grandparents; and 34 African American and 31 white older grandparents. Trained female interviewers, matched with interviewees by race, conducted face-to-face interviews with grandparents. Participants were asked sociodemographic information about themselves and others in their household, to describe the circumstances surrounding their becoming surrogate parents, to offer health and life stage information, and to answer questions about supports, stressors, and satisfactions. A hierarchical regression analysis revealed that contextual factors, stressors related to caretaking, and lack of supports accounted for 35 percent of the variance. Younger grandparents, children with psychological and physical problems, and low family cohesion were associated with stress. Implications for clinical and educational intervention are discussed. When there was a lack of support and resources, there was heightened psychological anxiety after controlling for background and contextual conditions and caretaking stressors. 5 tables and numerous references. (Author abstract modified)

 

KEY TERMS:         anxiety;  grandparents;  interviews;  psychological stress;  family support systems;  support systems;  caretakers

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.ncfr.com

 

 

TITLE:                    Posttraumatic Stress in Children Exposed to Family Violence and Single-Event Trauma.

 

AUTHOR:               McCloskey, L. A.;  Walker, M.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Harvard Univ., Boston. School of Public Health.

 

SOURCE:                39(1): pp. 108-115;  Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, Hagerstown, MD., January 2000

 

ABSTRACT:           This study examined posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other comorbid forms of psychopathy in a sample of children exposed to chronic abuse and single-event trauma. A total of 337 school age children were assessed for exposure to traumatic events (family violence, violent crime, death or illness of someone close to child, accidents) and posttraumatic stress symptoms. Children and mothers received structured diagnostic interviews to assess child psychopathology. Children from violent households were no more likely to report an extrafamilial traumatic stressor than children from nonviolent homes. Among the children reporting a traumatic event, 24.6 percent met the diagnostic criteria for PTSD. The leading precipitating event for PTSD symptoms was death or illness of someone close to the child. Family violence, violent crime, but not accidents also resulted in PTSD. Children with PTSD displayed comorbidity across different symptom classes, most notably phobias and separation anxiety. Both type 1 and type 2 trauma can result in PTSD in about one quarter of children. Children with posttraumatic stress symptoms had many other forms of comorbid psychopathology, indicating a global and diffuse impact of trauma on children. 3 tables and numerous references. (Author abstract modified)

 

KEY TERMS:         trauma;  postraumatic stress disorder;  psychopathy;  school children;  family violence;  separation anxiety;  interviews

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    Enhancing Law Enforcement Identification and Investigation of Child Maltreatment.

 

AUTHOR:               Portwood, S. G.;  Grady, M. T.;  Dutton, S. E.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Abuse and Neglect

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Missouri Univ., Kansas City.

 

SOURCE:                24(2): pp. 195-207;  Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY., February 2000

 

ABSTRACT:           Data from 2 independent studies is presented, representing the investigators' ongoing work with faculty from a state criminal justice academy to analyze existing knowledge and skills among veteran law enforcement officers and recruits, as well as to enhance future training. Through an anonymous questionnaire, the first of these studies examined officers' perceptions of maltreatment, including those factors that do and do not influence a determination of whether a particular act constitutes child maltreatment and assessments of whether particular acts constitute abuse or neglect. The second study also utilized an anonymous questionnaire to examine officers' knowledge of the developmental strengths and limitations of children relative to their ability to provide accurate information in suspected cases of child maltreatment. As hypothesized, several gaps both in law enforcement officers' knowledge of certain characteristics that can serve to denote a case of maltreatment and their knowledge of fundamental developmental issues and interview techniques that could assist them in the performance of their professional duties are identified. Suggestions for enhanced law enforcement training programs are presented and discussed. 4 tables and numerous references. (Author abstract modified)

 

KEY TERMS:         investigations;  law enforcement;  questionnaires;  identification;  assessment;  professional training

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    Child Characteristics Which Impact Accuracy of Recall and Suggestibility in Preschoolers: Is Age the Best Predictor?

 

AUTHOR:               Geddie, L.;  Fradin, S.;  Beer, J.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Abuse and Neglect

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    East Carolina Univ., Greenville, NC. Dept. of Psychology.

 

SOURCE:                24(2): pp. 223-235;  Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY., February 2000

 

ABSTRACT:           This study determined whether individual difference factors of metamemory, intelligence, and temperament can improve the ability to predict accuracy of recall and suggestibility in preschoolers. Fifty-six children ranging in age from 43 months to 83 months were recruited from 13 child care centers in a rural southwestern town. Children participated in a circus day event conducted by 2 female undergraduate psychology students dressed as clowns. About 10 days after the event, children were interviewed regarding their experiences. Bivariate correlations and multiple regression analyses were performed in order to determine which factors were related and unique contributors to accuracy of memory and suggestibility. Of principal importance is the finding that child characteristics such as metamemory ability, intellectual functioning, and temperament may indeed be helpful in determining a child's capacity to accurately recall information in an interview, although for the most part age is the best predictor. Findings also underscore the importance of considering a child's socioeconomic status and race when planning and conducting interviews with young children. Possible explanations for these findings as well as implications for future research and clinical application are discussed. 2 tables and numerous references. (Author abstract modified)

 

KEY TERMS:         preschool children;  memory;  suggestibility;  individual characteristics;  predictor variables;  interviews;  intelligence

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    Delay in Disclosure of Childhood Rape: Results From a National Survey.

 

AUTHOR:               Smith, D. W.;  Letourneau, E. J.;  Saunders, B. E.;  Kilpatrick, D. G. et al.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Abuse and Neglect

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville. Dept. of Psychology.

 

SOURCE:                24(2): pp. 273-287;  Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY., February 2000

 

ABSTRACT:           This study gathered representative data regarding the length of time women who were raped before age 18 delayed prior to disclosing such rapes, whom they disclosed to, and variables that predicted disclosure within 1 month. Data were gathered from 3,220 wave 2 respondents from the National Women's Study, a nationally representative telephone survey of women's experiences with trauma and mental health. Of these, 288 retrospectively reported at least 1 rape prior to their eighteenth birthday. Details of rape experiences were analyzed to identify predictors of disclosure within 1 month. Fully 28 percent of child rape victims reported that they had never told anyone about their child rape prior to the research interview; 47 percent did not disclose for over 5 years post-rape. Close friends were the most common confidants. Younger age at the time of rape, family relationship with the perpetrator, and experiencing a series of rapes were associated with disclosure latencies longer than 1 month; shorter delays were associated with stranger rapes. Logistic regression revealed that age at rape and knowing the perpetrator were independently predictive of delayed disclosure. Delayed disclosure of childhood rape was very common, and long delays were typical. Few variables were identified that successfully predicted disclosure behavior, but older age and rape by a stranger were associated with more rapid disclosure. This suggests that the likelihood of disclosure in a given case is difficult to estimate, and predictions based on single variables are unwarranted. 6 tables and numerous references. (Author abstract modified)

 

KEY TERMS:         national surveys;  rape;  disclosure;  predictor variables;  adults abused as children

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    ANTI-SOCIAL BEHAVIOR AS A RESULT OF ABUSE: Selected Articles.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

SOURCE:                NCCAN Annotated Bibliographies;  2000

 

KEY TERMS:         kinship care;  drug exposed infants;  sequelae;  child placement;  outcomes;  prevalence;  behavior problems;  child welfare research;  longitudinal studies;  violence;  symptoms;  adolescents;  school surveys;  ethnicity;  urban environment;  risk factors;  physical abuse;  corporal punishment;  child abuse research;  china;  sexual behavior;  child behavior;  predictor variables;  spouse abuse;  child witnesses of family violence;  child development;  research methodology;  data collection;  measures;  sexual abuse;  etiology;  sexually abusive children;  differential diagnoses;  case studies;  adolescent;  adults abused as children;  attachment behavior;  nonmarital violence;  aggressive behavior;  juvenile delinquency;  homicide;  psychological characteristics;  family violence;  suicide;  antisocial behavior;  impulsive behavior;  mothers;  posttraumatic stress disorder;  battered women;  community violence;  emotional problems;  child abuse history;  adoption;  foster care;  school children;  family relationships;  family support systems

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Annotated Bibliography

 

INTRODUCTION:    This annotated bibliography is a product of the National Clearinghouse
on Child Abuse and Neglect Information. The references have been selected
from thousands of materials available in our database to provide you with
the most up-to-date information related to child victims, witnesses, and
perpetrators of violence.

This bibliography looks at prevention, intervention and treatment issues
in relation to the impacts of violence on children. It is presented in
three sections: children as victims of violence, children as witnesses of
violence, and children and adolescents as perpetrators of violence.
Although many references cover more than one subject area, each citation
is listed only once in this bibliography, primarily under its major
subject heading.

All documents in this bibliography are contained in the Clearinghouse
library and are referenced following the format of the American
Psychological Association (APA). Authors, titles, publication dates and
publishers are provided within this format for each reference. We are
not, however, able to provide photocopies of all materials due to
copyright restrictions. Copies of publications that are not copyrighted,
such as Government publications, grant reports, or unpublished papers,
are available from the Clearinghouse for a reproduction fee of $0.10 per
page. Journal articles and chapters in books are copyrighted and may be
found at research or university libraries.

Information Specialists can answer questions about copyright status and
ordering information, as well as guide you in selecting materials from
this bibliography or suggest other materials that may be useful to you.
In addition, Specialists are available to conduct customized searches
of Clearinghouse databases for a base fee of $5.00 plus $.20 per record.

For more information, please contact

National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect Information
330 C St., SW
Washington, DC 20447
Tel.:  (800)394-3366 or 703-385-7565
Fax:   703-385-3206
E-mail:   nccanch@calib.com

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.calib.com/nccanch

 

 

TITLE:                    CHILD WELFARE PROFESSIONAL TRAINING: Selected Articles.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

SOURCE:                NCCAN Annotated Bibliographies;  2000

 

KEY TERMS:         kinship care;  professional training;  child welfare workers;  curricula;  competency based training;  assessment;  intervention strategies;  service delivery;  social workers;  social workers role;  personnel needs;  child protective services;  child welfare services;  personnel management;  competency;  children with disabilities;  developmental disabilities;  foster care;  foster parents training;  program models;  interagency collaboration;  evaluation methods;  validity;  testing;  outcomes;  longitudinal studies;  program evaluation;  family preservation;  cultural competency;  schools of social work;  resource materials;  child welfare research;  risk factors;  prevention;  child welfare research;  child welfare agencies;  substance abuse;  multidisciplinary teams;  child welfare reform;  pennsylvania;  interdisciplinary approach;  new york;  social workers attitudes;  caseload;  staff development;  florida;  investigations;  supervisors;  foster care workers;  california;  measures

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Annotated Bibliography

 

INTRODUCTION:    This annotated bibliography is a product of the National Clearinghouse
on Child Abuse and Neglect Information. The references have been selected
from thousands of materials available in our database to provide you with
the most up-to-date information related to child victims, witnesses, and
perpetrators of violence.

This bibliography looks at prevention, intervention and treatment issues
in relation to the impacts of violence on children. It is presented in
three sections: children as victims of violence, children as witnesses of
violence, and children and adolescents as perpetrators of violence.
Although many references cover more than one subject area, each citation
is listed only once in this bibliography, primarily under its major
subject heading.

All documents in this bibliography are contained in the Clearinghouse
library and are referenced following the format of the American
Psychological Association (APA). Authors, titles, publication dates and
publishers are provided within this format for each reference. We are
not, however, able to provide photocopies of all materials due to
copyright restrictions. Copies of publications that are not copyrighted,
such as Government publications, grant reports, or unpublished papers,
are available from the Clearinghouse for a reproduction fee of $0.10 per
page. Journal articles and chapters in books are copyrighted and may be
found at research or university libraries.

Information Specialists can answer questions about copyright status and
ordering information, as well as guide you in selecting materials from
this bibliography or suggest other materials that may be useful to you.
In addition, Specialists are available to conduct customized searches
of Clearinghouse databases for a base fee of $5.00 plus $.20 per record.

For more information, please contact

National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect Information
330 C St., SW
Washington, DC 20447
Tel.:  (800)394-3366 or 703-385-7565
Fax:   703-385-3206
E-mail:   nccanch@calib.com

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.calib.com/nccanch

 

 

TITLE:                    OUT OF HOME CARE: RESIDENTIAL CARE AND GROUP HOMES: Selected Articles.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

SOURCE:                NCCAN Annotated Bibliographies;  2000

 

KEY TERMS:         orphanages;  orphans;  social policies;  policy formation;  child welfare reform;  family preservation;  outcomes;  adoption;  funding;  child welfare services;  institutional abuse and neglect;  foster care drift;  judicial role;  permanency planning;  florida;  historical perspective;  deinstitutionalization;  model programs;  program descriptions;  program development;  residential care institutions;  welfare reform;  political factors;  private sector;  poverty;  therapeutic effectiveness;  child placement;  economic disadvantage;  attitudes;  child development;  research reviews;  psychological characteristics;  research methodology;  maternal deprivation;  foster care;  incidence;  statistical data;  predictor variables;  social workers attitudes;  public opinion;  government role;  discipline;  state statutory law;  federal statutory law;  vocational training;  state laws;  licensing;  standards;  state surveys;  personnel;  treatment programs;  program models;  federal aid;  grants;  religious organizations;  family characteristics;  family life;  program costs;  cost effectiveness;  costs;  operating expenses;  program planning;  federal laws;  sequelae;  residential care;  michigan;  child welfare research;  managed care;  residential treatment;  program administration;  out of home care;  foster children;  direct service providers;  emotionally disturbed children;  behavior modification;  therapeutic intervention;  intervention strategies;  service delivery;  program evaluation;  family programs;  shared family care;  adolescent sex offenders;  sex offenders therapy;  hispanics;  american indians;  african americans;  models;  parenting;  group dynamics;  control;  interviews;  adolescents;  focus groups;  family therapy;  canada;  cultural conflicts;  residential schools;  environmental stress;  trauma;  counselors;  disclosure;  mental health services;  social services;  mental disorders;  institutions

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Annotated Bibliography

 

INTRODUCTION:    This annotated bibliography is a product of the National Clearinghouse
on Child Abuse and Neglect Information. The references have been selected
from thousands of materials available in our database to provide you with
the most up-to-date information related to child victims, witnesses, and
perpetrators of violence.

This bibliography looks at prevention, intervention and treatment issues
in relation to the impacts of violence on children. It is presented in
three sections: children as victims of violence, children as witnesses of
violence, and children and adolescents as perpetrators of violence.
Although many references cover more than one subject area, each citation
is listed only once in this bibliography, primarily under its major
subject heading.

All documents in this bibliography are contained in the Clearinghouse
library and are referenced following the format of the American
Psychological Association (APA). Authors, titles, publication dates and
publishers are provided within this format for each reference. We are
not, however, able to provide photocopies of all materials due to
copyright restrictions. Copies of publications that are not copyrighted,
such as Government publications, grant reports, or unpublished papers,
are available from the Clearinghouse for a reproduction fee of $0.10 per
page. Journal articles and chapters in books are copyrighted and may be
found at research or university libraries.

Information Specialists can answer questions about copyright status and
ordering information, as well as guide you in selecting materials from
this bibliography or suggest other materials that may be useful to you.
In addition, Specialists are available to conduct customized searches
of Clearinghouse databases for a base fee of $5.00 plus $.20 per record.

For more information, please contact

National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect Information
330 C St., SW
Washington, DC 20447
Tel.:  (800)394-3366 or 703-385-7565
Fax:   703-385-3206
E-mail:   nccanch@calib.com

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.calib.com/nccanch

 

 

TITLE:                    Legislation Mandating Autopsies in Child Death Cases (Current through December 31, 1999): Florida.

 

INST. AUTHOR:    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES;  NATIONAL CLEARINGHOUSE ON CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT INFORMATION;  NATIONAL CENTER FOR PROSECUTION OF CHILD ABUSE

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Investigations Number 13

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES  Administration for Children and Families  Administration on Children, Youth and Families  Children's Bureau;  NATIONAL CLEARINGHOUSE ON CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT INFORMATION  330 C Street, SW, Washington, DC, 20447, (703) 385-7565  Outside Metropolitan Area: (800) FYI-3366;  NATIONAL CENTER FOR PROSECUTION OF CHILD ABUSE  99 Canal Center Plaza, Suite 510, Alexandria, VA, 22314, (703) 739-0321

 

SOURCE:                In: Mandatory Autopsies and Child Death Review Teams

 

KEY TERMS:         Statute;  Florida;  Abuse;  adolescent;  assessment;  Autopsies;  Child;  Child Abuse;  child abuse or neglect;  Child Death Cases;  Children;  circumstances;  Commission;  critical;  Department;  Failure;  Family;  health care;  Information;  Law Enforcement;  Legislation;  Mandating Autopsies;  neglect;  practitioner;  professional;  Secretary;  services;  sibling;  subdivision

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Statutes

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.ndaa-apri.org

 

 

TITLE:                    Legislation Requiring or Authorizing Joint Investigations and Cooperation Between Law Enforcement and Child Protection Agencies in Child Abuse Cases (Current through December 31, 1999): Florida.

 

INST. AUTHOR:    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES;  NATIONAL CLEARINGHOUSE ON CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT INFORMATION;  NATIONAL CENTER FOR PROSECUTION OF CHILD ABUSE

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Investigations Number 14

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES  Administration for Children and Families  Administration on Children, Youth and Families  Children's Bureau;  NATIONAL CLEARINGHOUSE ON CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT INFORMATION  330 C Street, SW, Washington, DC, 20447, (703) 385-7565  Outside Metropolitan Area: (800) FYI-3366;  NATIONAL CENTER FOR PROSECUTION OF CHILD ABUSE  99 Canal Center Plaza, Suite 510, Alexandria, VA, 22314, (703) 739-0321

 

SOURCE:                In: Authorization for Joint Investigations

 

KEY TERMS:         Statute;  Florida;  abandonment;  Abuse;  Child;  Child Abuse;  Child Abuse Cases;  Child Protection Agencies;  circumstances;  conduct;  Cooperation;  Criminal;  Department;  face-to-face;  Investigation;  Joint Investigation;  jurisdiction;  Law Enforcement;  Legislation;  neglect;  offense

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Statutes

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.ndaa-apri.org

 

 

TITLE:                    Legislation Requiring or Authorizing Joint Investigations and Cooperation Between Law Enforcement and Child Protection Agencies in Child Abuse Cases (Current through December 31, 1999): Minnesota.

 

INST. AUTHOR:    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES;  NATIONAL CLEARINGHOUSE ON CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT INFORMATION;  NATIONAL CENTER FOR PROSECUTION OF CHILD ABUSE

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Investigations Number 14

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES  Administration for Children and Families  Administration on Children, Youth and Families  Children's Bureau;  NATIONAL CLEARINGHOUSE ON CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT INFORMATION  330 C Street, SW, Washington, DC, 20447, (703) 385-7565  Outside Metropolitan Area: (800) FYI-3366;  NATIONAL CENTER FOR PROSECUTION OF CHILD ABUSE  99 Canal Center Plaza, Suite 510, Alexandria, VA, 22314, (703) 739-0321

 

SOURCE:                In: Authorization for Joint Investigations

 

KEY TERMS:         Statute;  Minnesota;  Abuse;  assessment;  Child;  Child Abuse;  Child Abuse Cases;  Child Protection Agencies;  Cooperation;  Investigation;  Joint Investigation;  Law Enforcement;  Legislation;  neglect;  treatment

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Statutes

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.ndaa-apri.org

 

 

TITLE:                    Legislation Requiring or Authorizing Joint Investigations and Cooperation Between Law Enforcement and Child Protection Agencies in Child Abuse Cases (Current through December 31, 1999): Pennsylvania.

 

INST. AUTHOR:    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES;  NATIONAL CLEARINGHOUSE ON CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT INFORMATION;  NATIONAL CENTER FOR PROSECUTION OF CHILD ABUSE

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Investigations Number 14

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES  Administration for Children and Families  Administration on Children, Youth and Families  Children's Bureau;  NATIONAL CLEARINGHOUSE ON CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT INFORMATION  330 C Street, SW, Washington, DC, 20447, (703) 385-7565  Outside Metropolitan Area: (800) FYI-3366;  NATIONAL CENTER FOR PROSECUTION OF CHILD ABUSE  99 Canal Center Plaza, Suite 510, Alexandria, VA, 22314, (703) 739-0321

 

SOURCE:                In: Authorization for Joint Investigations

 

KEY TERMS:         Statute;  Pennsylvania;  Abuse;  Child;  Child Abuse;  Child Abuse Cases;  Child Protection Agencies;  Cooperation;  county agency;  health care;  Investigation;  Joint Investigation;  Law Enforcement;  Legislation;  services;  trauma

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Statutes

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.ndaa-apri.org

 

 

TITLE:                    Legislation Mandating or Authorizing the Creation of Multidisciplinary/Multi-Agency Child Protection Teams (Current through December 31, 1999): Oklahoma.

 

INST. AUTHOR:    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES;  NATIONAL CLEARINGHOUSE ON CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT INFORMATION;  NATIONAL CENTER FOR PROSECUTION OF CHILD ABUSE

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Investigations Number 15

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES  Administration for Children and Families  Administration on Children, Youth and Families  Children's Bureau;  NATIONAL CLEARINGHOUSE ON CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT INFORMATION  330 C Street, SW, Washington, DC, 20447, (703) 385-7565  Outside Metropolitan Area: (800) FYI-3366;  NATIONAL CENTER FOR PROSECUTION OF CHILD ABUSE  99 Canal Center Plaza, Suite 510, Alexandria, VA, 22314, (703) 739-0321

 

SOURCE:                In: Authorization for Multidisciplinary Team

 

KEY TERMS:         Statute;  Oklahoma;  Abuse;  Agency;  Child;  Child Abuse;  Creation;  Department;  Director;  Human Services;  jeopardy;  Legislation;  Multi-Agency;  Multidisciplinary/Multi-Agency;  neglect;  professional;  services;  treatment

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Statutes

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.ndaa-apri.org

 

 

TITLE:                    Involuntary Civil Commitment of Sexually Violent Predators (Current through December 31, 1999): Missouri.

 

INST. AUTHOR:    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES;  NATIONAL CLEARINGHOUSE ON CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT INFORMATION;  NATIONAL CENTER FOR PROSECUTION OF CHILD ABUSE

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Investigations Number 19

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES  Administration for Children and Families  Administration on Children, Youth and Families  Children's Bureau;  NATIONAL CLEARINGHOUSE ON CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT INFORMATION  330 C Street, SW, Washington, DC, 20447, (703) 385-7565  Outside Metropolitan Area: (800) FYI-3366;  NATIONAL CENTER FOR PROSECUTION OF CHILD ABUSE  99 Canal Center Plaza, Suite 510, Alexandria, VA, 22314, (703) 739-0321

 

SOURCE:                In: Involuntary Civil Commitment of Sexually Violent Predators

 

KEY TERMS:         Statute;  Missouri;  assessment;  Civil Commitment;  conduct;  evaluation;  Mental abnormality;  offense;  relationship;  Sexually Violent Predators;  treatment

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Statutes

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.ndaa-apri.org

 

 

TITLE:                    Legislation Regarding the Admissibility Of Videotaped Interviews/Statements In Criminal Child Abuse Proceedings (Current through December 31, 1999): Iowa.

 

INST. AUTHOR:    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES;  NATIONAL CLEARINGHOUSE ON CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT INFORMATION;  NATIONAL CENTER FOR PROSECUTION OF CHILD ABUSE

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Witnesses Number 22

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES  Administration for Children and Families  Administration on Children, Youth and Families  Children's Bureau;  NATIONAL CLEARINGHOUSE ON CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT INFORMATION  330 C Street, SW, Washington, DC, 20447, (703) 385-7565  Outside Metropolitan Area: (800) FYI-3366;  NATIONAL CENTER FOR PROSECUTION OF CHILD ABUSE  99 Canal Center Plaza, Suite 510, Alexandria, VA, 22314, (703) 739-0321

 

SOURCE:                In: Admissibility of Videotaped Interviews or Statements

 

KEY TERMS:         Statute;  Iowa;  Abuse;  Admissibility;  Child;  Child Abuse;  Criminal Child Abuse;  Criminal;  Legislation;  Proceedings;  Statement;  Videotaped Interviews

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Statutes

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.ndaa-apri.org

 

 

TITLE:                    Legislation Regarding the Admissibility Of Videotaped Interviews/Statements In Criminal Child Abuse Proceedings (Current through December 31, 1999): Louisiana.

 

INST. AUTHOR:    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES;  NATIONAL CLEARINGHOUSE ON CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT INFORMATION;  NATIONAL CENTER FOR PROSECUTION OF CHILD ABUSE

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Witnesses Number 22

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES  Administration for Children and Families  Administration on Children, Youth and Families  Children's Bureau;  NATIONAL CLEARINGHOUSE ON CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT INFORMATION  330 C Street, SW, Washington, DC, 20447, (703) 385-7565  Outside Metropolitan Area: (800) FYI-3366;  NATIONAL CENTER FOR PROSECUTION OF CHILD ABUSE  99 Canal Center Plaza, Suite 510, Alexandria, VA, 22314, (703) 739-0321

 

SOURCE:                In: Admissibility of Videotaped Interviews or Statements

 

KEY TERMS:         Statute;  Louisiana;  Abuse;  Admissibility;  Child;  Child Abuse;  child's testimony;  Children;  conduct;  Criminal Child Abuse;  Criminal;  defendant;  Department;  Legislation;  Proceedings;  Statement;  Videotaped Interviews

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Statutes

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.ndaa-apri.org

 

 

TITLE:                    Legislation Regarding the Admissibility Of Videotaped Interviews/Statements In Criminal Child Abuse Proceedings (Current through December 31, 1999): Minnesota.

 

INST. AUTHOR:    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES;  NATIONAL CLEARINGHOUSE ON CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT INFORMATION;  NATIONAL CENTER FOR PROSECUTION OF CHILD ABUSE

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Witnesses Number 22

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES  Administration for Children and Families  Administration on Children, Youth and Families  Children's Bureau;  NATIONAL CLEARINGHOUSE ON CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT INFORMATION  330 C Street, SW, Washington, DC, 20447, (703) 385-7565  Outside Metropolitan Area: (800) FYI-3366;  NATIONAL CENTER FOR PROSECUTION OF CHILD ABUSE  99 Canal Center Plaza, Suite 510, Alexandria, VA, 22314, (703) 739-0321

 

SOURCE:                In: Admissibility of Videotaped Interviews or Statements

 

KEY TERMS:         Statute;  Minnesota;  Abuse;  Admissibility;  Child;  Child Abuse;  circumstances;  Criminal Child Abuse;  Criminal;  Legislation;  penetration;  Proceedings;  relationship;  Statement;  Videotaped Interviews

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Statutes

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.ndaa-apri.org

 

 

TITLE:                    Legislation Regarding the Appointment of a Guardian Ad Litem in Criminal Child Abuse Cases (Current through December 31, 1999): Florida.

 

INST. AUTHOR:    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES;  NATIONAL CLEARINGHOUSE ON CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT INFORMATION;  NATIONAL CENTER FOR PROSECUTION OF CHILD ABUSE

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Witnesses Number 26

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES  Administration for Children and Families  Administration on Children, Youth and Families  Children's Bureau;  NATIONAL CLEARINGHOUSE ON CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT INFORMATION  330 C Street, SW, Washington, DC, 20447, (703) 385-7565  Outside Metropolitan Area: (800) FYI-3366;  NATIONAL CENTER FOR PROSECUTION OF CHILD ABUSE  99 Canal Center Plaza, Suite 510, Alexandria, VA, 22314, (703) 739-0321

 

SOURCE:                In: Authorization for Special Support Persons in Criminal Child Abuse Proceedings

 

KEY TERMS:         Statute;  Florida;  abandonment;  Abuse;  advocate;  Appointment;  Child;  Child Abuse;  Child Abuse Cases;  child abuse or neglect;  Criminal Child Abuse;  Criminal;  Guardian;  Legislation;  neglect;  offense

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Statutes

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.ndaa-apri.org

 

 

TITLE:                    Legislation Regarding the Appointment of a Guardian Ad Litem in Criminal Child Abuse Cases (Current through December 31, 1999): Oklahoma.

 

INST. AUTHOR:    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES;  NATIONAL CLEARINGHOUSE ON CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT INFORMATION;  NATIONAL CENTER FOR PROSECUTION OF CHILD ABUSE

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Witnesses Number 26

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES  Administration for Children and Families  Administration on Children, Youth and Families  Children's Bureau;  NATIONAL CLEARINGHOUSE ON CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT INFORMATION  330 C Street, SW, Washington, DC, 20447, (703) 385-7565  Outside Metropolitan Area: (800) FYI-3366;  NATIONAL CENTER FOR PROSECUTION OF CHILD ABUSE  99 Canal Center Plaza, Suite 510, Alexandria, VA, 22314, (703) 739-0321

 

SOURCE:                In: Authorization for Special Support Persons in Criminal Child Abuse Proceedings

 

KEY TERMS:         Statute;  Oklahoma;  Abuse;  advocate;  Appointment;  Child;  Child Abuse;  Child Abuse Cases;  child abuse or neglect;  Criminal Child Abuse;  Criminal;  Guardian;  Legislation;  neglect;  Prevention;  Report;  services

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Statutes

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.ndaa-apri.org

 

 

TITLE:                    Legislation Limiting the Number of Interviews with Child Victims (Current through December 31, 1999): Minnesota.

 

INST. AUTHOR:    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES;  NATIONAL CLEARINGHOUSE ON CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT INFORMATION;  NATIONAL CENTER FOR PROSECUTION OF CHILD ABUSE

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Witnesses Number 28

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES  Administration for Children and Families  Administration on Children, Youth and Families  Children's Bureau;  NATIONAL CLEARINGHOUSE ON CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT INFORMATION  330 C Street, SW, Washington, DC, 20447, (703) 385-7565  Outside Metropolitan Area: (800) FYI-3366;  NATIONAL CENTER FOR PROSECUTION OF CHILD ABUSE  99 Canal Center Plaza, Suite 510, Alexandria, VA, 22314, (703) 739-0321

 

SOURCE:                In: Special Procedures in Criminal Child Abuse Cases

 

KEY TERMS:         Statute;  Minnesota;  assessment;  Child;  conduct;  Legislation

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Statutes

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.ndaa-apri.org

 

 

TITLE:                    Interviewing Ethnic Children and Families About Child Maltreatment.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        2000

 

ABSTRACT:           Fontes teaches how to help diverse ethnic children speak as comfortably and accurately as possible about experiences of child abuse and neglect.  She discusses building rapport with children and families of diverse backgrounds, and how to conduct interviews with children who do not speak English.  This tape will help professionals who work with immigrant children, including social workers, forensic interviewers, psychotherapists, law enforcement professionals, physicians, nurses, educators, and attorneys.

 

TARGET AUDIENCE:          professionals

 

KEY TERMS:         ethnic groups;  child neglect;  interviews;  professional personnel

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Audiotape

 

YEAR:                     2000

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.sagepub.com/

 

BROAD TERMS:   Child Welfare

 

 

TITLE:                    Adoptive Family Adjustment and Its Relation to Perceived Family Environment.

 

AUTHOR:               Martin, B.;  Kelly, M. M.;  Towner-Thyrum, E.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Adoption Quarterly

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Millersville Univ., PA. Dept. of Psyschology.

 

SOURCE:                3(1): pp. 49-60;  Haworth Press, Inc., Binghamton, NY., 1999;  p. 21

 

ABSTRACT:           Fifty-one adopted college students from three mid-sized East Coast universities participated in interviews structured to gather information regarding adoptees' perceptions of adoptive family life. They were asked for their perspective of the overall environment that characterized their family life as well as their perceptions of how their families dealt with the tasks unique to their adoption. Additionally, subjects completed a scale that measured their perceptions of general characteristics of family environment. Multiple regression analysis revealed that of ten adoption-specific factors derived from interview data, overall satisfaction with one's adoptive status and family life was the strongest predictor of perceived general family environment. Adoptee satisfaction predicted high levels of family expressiveness, ethical focus, and involvement in shared activities as well as low levels of family conflict. Adoptees' perception of adoptive fathers' and mothers' communication styles predicted different aspects of family environment. Adoptees' acknowledgement of life differences due to their adoptive status did not relate to family expressiveness. The latter finding lends support to recent research suggesting that acknowledgement and expressiveness are independent aspects of adoptive family functioning. Three tables, 13 references. (Author abstract modified)

 

KEY TERMS:         adoptive families;  adjustment problems;  family environment;  data collection;  data analysis;  communication;  surveys;  adolescents

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.haworthpressinc.com

 

 

TITLE:                    Cultural Identity and Place in Adult Korean-American Intercountry Adoptees.

 

AUTHOR:               Meier, D. I.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Adoption Quarterly

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Jackson Public Schools, MI.

 

SOURCE:                3(1): pp. 15-48;  Haworth Press, Inc., Binghamton, NY., 1999;  p. 22

 

ABSTRACT:           This article explores the interrelationship between cultural identity and place in the lives of adult Korean adoptees living primarily in the Twin Cities area of Minnesota. Twenty-three adoptees responded to correspondence and solicitation, ranging in age from 19 to 35 , with most participants in their early twenties. Using life histories derived through multiple semi-structured interviews, a number of themes emerged that revealed the interplay among ethnicity, identity, gender, and place. A number of comments describing the participants' perspectives illustrate the article. From childhood to adulthood, most Korean adoptees followed a similar developmental trajectory of denial, self-awareness, and emerging cultural consciousness about their Korean heritage, particularly upon their departure from their adoptive homes after high school. These journeys were mediated and nuanced by environmental factors such as places adoptees lived or visited in Korea, the United States, or elsewhere abroad. The authors note the limitations of previous studies that focused only on adoptive parents or adoptees as children, which do not always address the life perspective of intercountry adoptees' search for identity, belonging, and a sense of home. Twenty-seven references. (Author abstract modified

 

KEY TERMS:         cultural identity;  korean americans;  adopted adults;  intercountry adoption;  minnesota;  denial;  self esteem;  research

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.haworthpressinc.com

 

 

TITLE:                    Supporting Adoption: Reframing the Approach.

 

AUTHOR:               Lowe, N.;  Murch, M.;  Borkowski, M.;  Weaver, A.;  et al.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Cardiff Law School, Wales (United Kingdom).

 

SOURCE:                British Agencies for Adoption and Fostering, London (United Kingdom)., August 1, 1999;  p. 61

 

ABSTRACT:           This research examined adoption preparation and support practices in England and Wales for families adopting children older than five years old. Data were collected from mail surveys and in-depth interviews with adoption agencies, adoptive parents, and adopted children. The study addressed changing attitudes toward adoption, agency recruitment policy and practice, agency policy on the adoption of older children, preparations for the child and the adopters, issues in matching, postplacement issues, the incidence and causes of disruption, legal processes, and financial and practical support. Agency workloads and the organization of adoption services are also discussed. Specific topics include: the social construction of adoption; pathways of older children in care; motivations to adopt older children; the introduction process; and the availability of complaints procedures. The report offers recommendations for policy and practice to improve the satisfaction of adopters and adoptees, such as legal mandates for post-adoption support, adoption allowances, the disclosure of information about the child, and accountability for the agency. 29 figures and 27 tables.

 

KEY TERMS:         adoption preparation;  adoption support;  adoption research;  great britain;  service delivery;  adoption reform movement;  program evaluation;  best practices

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Book

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.baaf.org.uk

 

 

TITLE:                    Materials for Interviewing-Questioning Children.

 

AUTHOR:               Walker, A. G.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

SOURCE:                Presented at: ABA Ninth National Conference on Children and the Law, Washington, DC, April 8-10, 1999. American Bar Association, Washington, DC. Center on Children and the Law.;  p. 85

 

ABSTRACT:           This document contains several papers prepared to help interviewers ask children about alleged child abuse and neglect experiences. The materials include a checklist, facts about children's language skills, guidelines for interviews, and a bibliography about the preparation and interviewing of child witnesses and testimonial aspects of child witnesses. Emphasis is placed on assessing the development and language skills of the child and forming questions that are clear and understandable. Interviewers are advised to ask simple questions, avoid legal terminology and abstract concepts, and be clear about the meanings of pronouns and literal language. 16 references.

 

KEY TERMS:         child witnesses;  interviews;  leading questions;  suggestibility;  testimony;  child development;  language development;  best practices

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Technical Report

 

 

TITLE:                    Conceptions of Family and Adoption Among Older Adoptees.

 

AUTHOR:               Sherrill, C. L.;  Pinderhughes, E. E.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Adoption Quarterly

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Behavioral Institute, Atlanta, GA.

 

SOURCE:                2(4): pp. 21-47;  Haworth Press, Inc., Binghamton, NY., 1999;  p. 138

 

ABSTRACT:           Drawing on the theoretical, clinical and empirical literature on children's understanding of family and adoption, this paper reports a study that examined older adoptees' conceptions of family and adoption relative to nonadopted peers. Interviews with 15 children adopted between ages 8 and 11 and a sample of 15 demographically matched nonadopted children provided data that were analyzed for differences in children's understanding and elaboration of family and adoption concepts. Although no group differences were found in children's basic understanding of family or adoption, differences emerged in children's ratings of the acceptability and typicality of family constellations, as well as in the nature of concept elaboration. Older adoptees were more likely to accept and view as typical nontraditional family constellations. Whereas nonadopted children relied more on biological themes, older adoptees' concept elaboration was qualitatively richer, reflecting their varied birth family and foster care experiences. Within-group comparisons among older adoptees revealed differences: children with more experiences in foster care and children who lived in the adoptive home longer displayed higher levels of family understanding and amore realistic perspective of the permanence of the placement. Implications for future research and adoption service delivery are discussed. 49 references and 4 tables. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         adoption research;  adopted adults;  adoption outcomes;  lifelong impact;  family relationships;  individual characteristics;  childs attitudes;  family life

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.haworthpressinc.com

 

 

TITLE:                    Intensive In-Home Family-Based Services: Reactions From Consumers and Providers.

 

AUTHOR:               Walton, E.;  Dodini, A. C.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Family Preservation Journal

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT. School of Social Work.

 

SOURCE:                4(2): pp. 39-51;  Eddie Bowers Publishing, Inc., Dubuque, IA., 1999;  p. 146

 

ABSTRACT:           An intensive family preservation program was examined through interviews with 31 families who received the services and four caseworkers. The primary findings from interviews with both care givers and caseworkers was that a positive therapeutic relationship between the worker and the client family contributes most to the success of the program. Workers who provided the services stressed the need for making concrete services available as well as clinical intervention and skills training, and they were adamant about screening families for appropriateness before including them in an intensive, in-home program. 34 references and 1 table. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         family preservation;  home based services;  program evaluation;  service delivery;  home visitors;  caseworkers;  assessment;  clinical intervention

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    Coordination of Family Preservation Services in a Rural Community: A Case Study.

 

AUTHOR:               Freer, R.;  Wells, K.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Family Preservation Journal

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Arkansas State Univ., Jonesboro. Dept. of Social Work.

 

SOURCE:                4(2): pp. 53-74;  Eddie Bowers Publishing, Inc., Dubuque, IA., 1999;  p. 147

 

ABSTRACT:           This case study examined the aspects of communities, human service agencies, workers, and families that affect the coordination of family preservation services in a rural area. Information was sought from all workers who provided services to each of five families and from the families' case records. Thirty-one workers were interviewed with a semi-structured instrument containing rating scales and questions with open-ended response formats. Analyses of data from the interviews andcase records revealed that services were coordinated to a moderate degree but that coordination deteriorated over time. Although workers met together frequently to review cases, there was no case in which all of the workers were present at the same meeting. The discussions usually addressed how to find services for families instead of how those services contributed to the overall treatment plan. Implications of findings for future research are reviewed in the article. 39 references and 3 tables. (Author abstract modified)

 

KEY TERMS:         family preservation;  service coordination;  interagency collaboration;  program descriptions;  rural environment;  community role;  agency role;  family role

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    Effective Interviewing of Children: A Comprehensive Guide for Counselors and Human Service Workers.

 

AUTHOR:               Zwiers, M.;  Morrissette, P.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Markham-Stouffville Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada). Mental Health Services.

 

SOURCE:                Taylor and Francis, Philadelphia, PA., 1999;  p. 175

 

ABSTRACT:           This book provides guidelines for conducting child-focused interviews for assessment, research, or legal purposes. The first two chapters outline child and professional variables that influence the quality of interviews. Emphasis is placed on understanding child development and the rapport between the child and the professional. The remaining chapters discuss practical considerations for interviews with children, the use of language, issues for special circumstances, and the ethics of interviewing. Recommendations for the research interview and diagnostic clinical interviews are also presented. Specific topics include: establishing rapport; timing of the interview; recording; pacing; types of questions; working with challenging children; aggression and withdrawal; data collection and analysis; informed consent; custody evaluation; child abuse; and psychopharmacology. Numerous references and 1 table.

 

KEY TERMS:         interviews;  evaluation methods;  assessment;  suggestibility;  credibility;  social workers role;  communication techniques;  leading questions

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Book

 

 

TITLE:                    Training New Child Welfare Staff on SACWIS Systems: Results and Lessons Learned From a 17-State Survey.

 

AUTHOR:               Brittain, C.;  Klein-Rothschild, S.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Protecting Children

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    American Humane Association, Englewood, CO. Children's Div.

 

SOURCE:                15(3-4): pp. 21-24;  American Humane Association, Englewood, CO., 1999;  p. 197

 

ABSTRACT:           Officials from the Colorado Department of Human Services surveyed their counterparts in 17 states to identify effective methods for training child welfare staff to use the Statewide Automated Child Welfare Information Systems (SACWIS). The telephone interview requested information about who is responsible for training new staff on the SACWIS system; how workers learn basic computer skills; how and when new workers are trained on SACWIS applications; how and when new supervisors learn to use the system for staff reviews and data reports; what has and hasn't worked in training; barriers to worker use of the system; and methods for evaluating the effectiveness of training. Most of the states indicated that they provide both an orientation to the application with general instruction on basic tasks, as well as specialized training that is relevant to job responsibilities. Regional on-the-job support and incremental training were most effective. The states also indicated that training games and remedial classes helped workers learn to use the system. Weaknesses of SACWIS training systems included organizational culture, problems with hardware, and timing between training and actual use. Few states offer a structured training specific to supervisors. Overall, the states indicated that the education process took longer than estimated and that trainers should be available for one-to-one consultation with workers. 4 references.

 

KEY TERMS:         sacwis;  data collection;  professional training;  child welfare workers;  state surveys;  staff development;  computer based training;  competency based training

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.americanhumane.org

 

 

TITLE:                    Timely Judicial Decisionmaking.

 

AUTHOR:               Lancour, R.;  Rauber, D. B.;  Hardin, M.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    ABA Center on Children and the Law, Washington, DC.

 

SOURCE:                Volume 4. American Bar Association, Chicago, IL., 1999;  p. 207

 

ABSTRACT:           Data collected from state assessments of dependency court procedures in child abuse and neglect cases were compiled for this report. The evaluations were conducted by each state from 1995 to 1998 as part of the federal court improvementprogram and included a review of court rules and key cases, as well as surveys and interviews with stakeholders. The fourth volume focuses on court processes that contribute to delays in resolving child abuse and neglect cases. It summarizes state reports about judicial time standards, existing time standards, the timing of specific events, active judicial management of the calendar, data collection about timing of hearings, and the timeliness of appeals. All stages of the dependency process are considered, from initiation of the case to permanency planning hearings, termination of parental rights petitions, final court orders, adoption, and the completion of the appeal. 10 tables.

 

KEY TERMS:         court reform;  judicial responsibility;  dependency;  legal timeframes;  legal processes;  timing of court hearing;  state surveys;  statistical data

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Book

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.abanet.org

 

 

TITLE:                    Judicial Training and Working Conditions.

 

AUTHOR:               Lancour, R.;  Rauber, D. B.;  Hardin, M.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    ABA Center on Children and the Law, Washington, DC.

 

SOURCE:                Volume 3. American Bar Association, Chicago, IL., 1999;  p. 208

 

ABSTRACT:           Data collected from state assessments of dependency court procedures in child abuse and neglect cases were compiled for this report. The evaluations were conducted by each state from 1995 to 1998 as part of the federal court improvementprogram and included a review of court rules and key cases, as well as surveys and interviews with stakeholders. The third volume reviews three factors that influence the ability of judges to make appropriate decisions: their knowledge and experience; training and continuing education; and judicial assignment practices. The prevalence of the one judge-one case practice is reported, as well as rotation lengths, transfers between courts, content and length of abuse and neglect training, regularity of training, attendance at training, and training requirements. 9 tables.

 

KEY TERMS:         court reform;  judicial role;  professional training;  judicial responsibility;  child abuse;  legal processes;  state surveys;  statistical data

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Book

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.abanet.org

 

 

TITLE:                    Memories of Childhood Abuse: Dissociation, Amnesia, and Corroboration.

 

AUTHOR:               Chu, J. A.;  Frey, L. M.;  Ganzel, B. L.;  Matthews, J. A.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    American Journal of Psychiatry

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    McLean Hospital, Belmont, MA. Dissociative Disorders and Trauma Program.

 

SOURCE:                165(5): pp. 749-755;  American Psychiatric Association, Washington, DC., May 1999;  p. 217

 

ABSTRACT:           This study investigated the relationship between self-reported childhood abuse and dissociative symptoms and amnesia. The presence or absence of corroboration of recovered memories of childhood abuse was also studied. Ninety female patients admitted to a unit specializing in the treatment of trauma-related disorders completed instruments that measured dissociative symptoms and elicited details concerning childhood physical abuse, sexual abuse, and witnessing abuse. They also underwent a structured interview that asked about amnesia for traumatic experiences, the circumstances of recovered memory, the role of suggestion in recovered memories, and independent corroboration of the memories. Participants reporting any type of childhood abuse demonstrated elevated levels of dissociative symptoms that were significantly higher than those in subjects not reporting abuse. Higher dissociative symptoms were correlated with early age at onset of physical and sexual abuse and more frequent sexual abuse. A substantial proportion of participants with all types of abuse reported partial or complete amnesia for abuse memories. For physical and sexual abuse, early age at onset was correlated with greater levels of amnesia. Participantswho reported recovering memories of abuse generally recalled these experiences while at home, alone, or with family or friends. Although some participants were in treatment at the time, very few were in therapy sessions during their first memory recovery. Suggestion was generally denied as a factor in memory recovery. A majority of participants were able to find strong corroboration of their recovered memories. Childhood abuse, particularly chronic abuse beginning at early ages, is related to the development of high levels of dissociative symptoms, including amnesia for abuse memories. This study strongly suggests that psychotherapy usually is not associated with memory recovery and that independent corroboration of recovered memories of abuse is often present. 39 references and 6 tables. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         memory;  adults abused as children;  sequelae;  dissociation;  amnesia;  corroboration;  child abuse research;  trauma

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    Sexually and Physically Abused Foster Care Children and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

 

AUTHOR:               Dubner, A. E.;  Motta, R. W.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Hofstra Univ., Hempstead, NY. Dept. of Psychology.

 

SOURCE:                67(3): pp. 367-373;  American Psychological Association, Washington, DC., 1999;  p. 227

 

ABSTRACT:           In this study, 3 groups of foster care children were compared to investigate the relationship between child abuse and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The groups included 50 sexually abused, 50 physically abused, and 50 nonabused foster care children. Participants completed the Child Post-Trumatic Stress Reaction Index, the Childhood PTSD Interview, and the Modified Stroop Procedure, which included sexual abuse and nonsexual abuse stimuli. Results indicated that sexually and physically abused children demonstrated PTSD at a high level. The Modified Stroop Procedure discriminated between the sexually abused children with PTSD and those without PTSD. Responses to the Stroop Procedure sexual abuse stimuli resulted in significantly longer color-naming times than responses to nonsexual abuse stimuli. Preadolescents demonstrated more severe PTSD than early adolescent children. 44 references and 1 table. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         sexual abuse;  physical abuse;  foster children;  sequelae;  posttraumatic stress disorder;  characteristics of abused;  child abuse research;  trauma

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.apa.org/

 

 

TITLE:                    Quality of Hearings.

 

AUTHOR:               Lancour, R.;  Rauber, D. B.;  Hardin, M.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    ABA Center on Children and the Law, Washington, DC.

 

SOURCE:                Volume 2. American Bar Association, Chicago, IL., 1999;  p. 244

 

ABSTRACT:           Data from state assessments of dependency courts were collected for this analysis of the quality of child protective hearings. The assessments, which were conducted as part of the federal court improvement initiative, consisted of case reviews, surveys, and interviews with key stakeholders in the judicial and social service system. The report reviews the elements of quality judicial hearings and summarizes findings from the self-assessments regarding the notification of parties, lengthof hearings, case reports and case plans, judicial caseloads, the length and depth of uncontested hearings, shelter care hearings, adjudication and disposition hearings, review hearings, and permanency hearings. State achievement of permanency planning goals is also addressed. The report includes excerpts from selected state court self-assessment studies and provides highlights of state practices throughout the text.

 

KEY TERMS:         court improvement projects;  state surveys;  dependency;  legal processes;  hearings;  permanency hearings;  permanency planning;  program evaluation

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Book

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.abanet.org

 

 

TITLE:                    Secret-Keeping Behaviors of Black and White Children as a Function of Interviewer Race, Racial Identity, and Risk for Abuse.

 

AUTHOR:               Dunkerley, G. K.;  Dalenberg, C. J.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment and Trauma

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Trauma Research Institute, San Diego, CA.

 

SOURCE:                2(2): pp. 13-35;  Haworth Press, Inc., Binghamton, NY., 1999;  p. 319

 

ABSTRACT:           The tendency for children to keep the secret of child abuse is an important practical impediment to adequate research, prevention, assessment, and treatment. While some studies have established that children will readily keep adult secrets, few have investigated the predictors of ease of disclosure. In this research, race of the interviewer requesting the secret strongly affected disclosure, with Black children particularly showing an unwillingness to disclose a negative secret to a different race interviewer. Children at high risk for sexual abuse (as assessed by the Finkelhor checklist) also were more likely to keep the secret. 53 references and 4 tables. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         disclosure;  children at risk;  racial factors;  racial identity;  interviews;  child abuse research;  child witnesses;  sexual abuse

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.haworthpressinc.com

 

 

TITLE:                    Questioning Children Who May Have Been Sexually Abused: An Integration of Research Into

 

AUTHOR:               Faller, K. C.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment and Trauma

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor. School of Social Work.

 

SOURCE:                2(2): pp. 37-59;  Haworth Press, Inc., Binghamton, NY., 1999;  p. 320

 

ABSTRACT:           This article derives from an Open Forum on Leading Questions sponsored by the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children. It represents the thoughts of participants in the Open Forum, and the article attempts to integrate analogue research that relates to questioning children about past events into questioning practice with children who may have been sexually abused. It proposes a continuum of questions that includes four categories: most preferred; preferred; less preferred; and least preferred. General and invitational questions are most preferred, while presumptive questions and use of coercion are least preferred methods of interviewing. 37 references and 1 table. (Author abstract modified)

 

KEY TERMS:         interviews;  sexual abuse;  child abuse research;  leading questions;  assessment;  child witnesses;  suggestibility;  best practices

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.haworthpressinc.com

 

 

TITLE:                    Statement Validity Analysis: Its Application to a Sample of Dutch Children Who May Have Been Sexually Abused.

 

AUTHOR:               Lamers-Winkelman, F.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment and Trauma

 

SOURCE:                2(2): pp. 59-81;  Haworth Press, Inc., Binghamton, NY., 1999;  p. 321

 

ABSTRACT:           All information regarding 103 Dutch sexual abuse cases was analyzed using the Validity Checklist (VC), the second part of the Statement Validity Analysis procedure. The fulfillment of the VC items was compared for four different age groups. Only two VC items differed significantly between the age groups. The systematic summarization of content analysis and validity checks revealed only a weak relationship between the fulfillment of the Criteria-Based Content Analysis (CBCA) and the VC items together and the outcome of the cases. The results suggest that the Statement Validity Analysis cannot yet be used as a scientifically validated instrument for judging the truthfulness of allegations of child sexual abuse. 39 references and 5 tables. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         sexual abuse;  interviews;  child witnesses;  testimony;  validity;  assessment;  measures;  netherlands

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.haworthpressinc.com

 

 

TITLE:                    Addressing Challenges and Controversies in Child Sexual Abuse Interviewing: The Forensic Evaluation Protocol and Research Project.

 

AUTHOR:               Carnes, C. N.;  Nelson-Gardell, D.;  Wilson, C.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment and Trauma

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    National Children's Advocacy Center, Huntsville, AL.

 

SOURCE:                2(2): pp. 82-103;  Haworth Press, Inc., Binghamton, NY., 1999;  p. 322

 

ABSTRACT:           This article describes a forensic evaluation protocol, designed at the National Children s Advocacy Center (NCAC). The means by which the NCAC forensic evaluation protocol addresses the challenges and controversies inherent in the fieldof sexual abuse allegation assessment are discussed. Results of a two-year study are reported, in which efficacy of the protocol is demonstrated in three areas: in gathering facts to validate true abuse, thus assisting the child protective and legal systems in case decision making; in determining when initial concerning statements of children are actually not due to sexual abuse, but to other events or circumstances; and in uncovering false allegations and vindicating the falsely accused. A multi-site research project currently underway that involves more than 40 Children s Advocacy Centers across the United States, which will further test the efficacy of the model and further refine practice, is described. The multi-site project will also include data on the evaluators own abuse history and whether or not this affects evaluation outcomes. 33 references and 2 tables. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         sexual abuse;  interviews;  forensic psychiatry;  protocols;  assessment;  false allegations;  program evaluation;  validity

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.haworthpressinc.com

 

 

TITLE:                    Overcoming Obstacles to Just Evaluation and Successful Prosecution of Multivictim Cases.

 

AUTHOR:               Dalenberg, C. J.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment and Trauma

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Trauma Research Institute, San Diego, CA.

 

SOURCE:                2(2): pp. 141-163;  Haworth Press, Inc., Binghamton, NY., 1999;  p. 324

 

ABSTRACT:           The multivictim case presents special difficulties for the child protection system, including enhanced probability of multiple interviews and potential contamination of children s narratives by a variety of sources. Further, multivictimcases have been empirically shown to be more likely to involve severely abused children, fantastic claims, and other complicating factors. This paper presents several complications likely to arise in such cases and a number of potential routes to mitigate the problems that occur. The complications include the impact of repeated interviews and delayed interviews, the use of leading questions, bizarre detail disclosed by the child, allegations of extreme trauma or abuse, contamination of testimony,the involvement of the child s therapist, advocacy groups and the media, and accusations against the interviewer. 46 references and 6 tables. (Author abstract modified)

 

KEY TERMS:         multivictim cases;  investigations;  barriers;  memory;  interviews;  protocols;  testimony;  suggestibility

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.haworthpressinc.com

 

 

TITLE:                    Impact of University-Agency Partnerships in Child Welfare on Organizations, Workers, and Work Activities.

 

AUTHOR:               Hopkins, K. M.;  Murdrick, N. R.;  Rudolph, C. S.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Welfare

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Syracuse Univ., NY. School of Social Work.

 

SOURCE:                78(6): pp. 749-773;  Child Welfare League of America, Inc., Washington, DC., November-December 1999;  p. 329

 

ABSTRACT:           Critiques of child welfare services in the public sector point to problems both in the training and skill level of workers, and in the organizational structure and rigidity of the agencies. University-agency partnerships have been developed to provide educational curricula to enhance public child welfare workers skills and to stimulate agency change. This article uses findings from focus group interviews of supervisors and workers to explore the impact of Master of Social Work education on changes in personal behavior, structure, and technological organization. The study, which was funded by grants from the Children s Bureau and the Administration on Children and Families, found that participation increased the confidence of child welfare workers and improved their sensitivity to clients and understanding of the overall context of child welfare service. The educational programs also increased the social work skills of workers. Fewer students and supervisors indicated that the agency-university partnership had an impact on the structure of the organization. Changes were reported in the areas of communication between workers and the agency and between workers who attended school and those who did not participate. Several students noted that they were frustrated in their attempt to apply their new skills without a change in organizational structure. Many were able to prompt their organizations into utilizing new technology, such as a telephone hotline for foster parents, foster parent training, and a short-term residential family support center. Benefits and challenges for both agencies and universities are discussed. 37 references. (Author abstract modified)

 

KEY TERMS:         child welfare services;  service delivery;  interagency collaboration;  cooperative planning;  schools of social work;  public agencies;  professional training;  child welfare workers

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    Adopted Children Speaking.

 

AUTHOR:               Thomas, C.;  Beckford, V.;  Lowe, N.;  Murch, M.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Cardiff Univ., Wales (United Kingdom).

 

SOURCE:                British Agencies for Adoption and Fostering, London (United Kingdom)., October 1, 1999;  p. 344

 

ABSTRACT:           This book, part of a wider research project, focuses on the views of children and adolescents in Great Britain involved in the adoption process, and the support they received during that process. It examines the experiences of older adopted children who have previously been looked after by local authorities and is designed to complement the larger research project, which examined the adoption process from the perspective of adoption agencies and adoptive parents. The study's qualitative approach allowed the children and adolescents to direct the study into areas they saw as significant, such as desire to know more about their birth families, with the intent of making the children active agents in the context of policy development. The sample included 41 children, who particpated in direct interviews. While some expressed anxieties about their pasts, concerns about their contact arrangements and feelings of being different to their peers about their adoptions, overall they spoke positively about their adoption, particularly valuing the support of their adoptive parents. Conclusions support the assertion that practice should be sensitive to childrens' needs, particularly by involving them and keeping them informed of the process. Numerous tables, notes, references; 11 apendixes; Resource list.

 

KEY TERMS:         adopted children;  great britain;  chidrens rights;  research;  data analysis;  policy formation;  adoption process;  support systems

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Book

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.baaf.org.uk

 

 

TITLE:                    Videotaping Child Disclosure Interviews: Exploratory Study of Children's Experiences and

 

AUTHOR:               Henry, J.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Journal of Child Sexual Abuse

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo. School of Social Work.

 

SOURCE:                8(4): pp. 35-49;  Haworth Press, Inc., Binghamton, NY., 1999;  p. 517

 

ABSTRACT:           The debate over whether to videotape victims of sexual abuse has lacked resolution because to date there has only been anecdotal experience to evaluate. This research void, the author of this study asserts, perpetuates the controversy +; and may deter localities from videotaping. The study examines the effects of videotaping compared to non-videotaping on a number of disclosure interviews, its impact on the likelihood of children testifying in court, and its effect on perpetrators' +; pleading. The study compares the investigatory and legal outcomes of 29 sexually abused children in three counties in Michigan, whose disclosure interviews were videotaped, with a group of 61 non-videotaped sexually abused children. Three testing +; instruments were administered during the interviews to measure the victim's perceived level of trauma and stress produced by system interventions. The results revealed that videotaped children were more likely to have fewer interviews and testify less +; frequently than the non-videotaped group. Offenders of videotaped sexually abused children were more likely to plead to criminal charges than offenders of the non-videotaped children. Eighty-six percent of videotaped sexually abused children indicated +; that videotaping was either helpful or had no effect on them. The results provide communities with information to evaluate as they seek to further refine their protocols to support sexually abused children and minimize stress caused by system +; interventions. Two tables; one note; 16 references.

 

KEY TERMS:         videotaping;  child abuse;  disclosure;  feasibility studies;  sex offenders;  trauma;  michigan;  outcomes

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.haworthpressinc.com

 

 

TITLE:                    Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Abused and Neglected Children Grown Up.

 

AUTHOR:               Widom, C. S.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    American Journal of Psychiatry

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Albany Univ., NY. School of Criminal Justice.

 

SOURCE:                156(8): pp. 1223-1229;  American Psychiatric Association, Washington, DC., August 1999;  p. 573

 

ABSTRACT:           The purpose of this study was to describe the extent to which childhood abuse and neglect increase a person's risk for subsequent posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and to determine whether the relationship to PTSD persists despite +; controls for family, individual, and lifestyle characteristics associated with both childhood victimization and PTSD. Victims of substantiated child abuse and neglect from 1967 to 1971 in a Midwestern metropolitan county area were matched on the basis of+; age, race, sex, and approximate family socioeconomic class with a group of nonabused and nonneglected children and followed prospectively into young adulthood. Subjects were located and administered a 2-hour interview that included the National +; Institute of Mental Health Diagnostic Interview Schedule to assess PTSD. Childhood victimization was associated with increased risk for lifetime and current PTSD. Slightly more than a third of the childhood victims of sexual abuse, 32.7 percent of those +; physically abused, and 30.6 percent of victims of childhood neglect met DSM-III-R criteria for lifetime PTSD. The relationship between childhood victimization and number of PTSD symptoms persisted despite the introduction of covariates associated with +; risk for both. Victims of child abuse (sexual and physical) and neglect are at increased risk for developing PTSD, but childhood victimization is not a sufficient condition. Family, individual, and lifestyle variables also place individuals at risk and +; contribute to the symptoms of PTSD. 43 references and 3 tables. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         adults abused as children;  sequelae;  risk factors;  posttraumatic stress disorder;  child abuse research;  family characteristics;  predictor variables;  characteristics of abused

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    Children Being Looked After and Their Sibling Relationships: The Experiences of Children in the Working in Partnership With 'Lost' Parents Research Project.

 

AUTHOR:               Harrison, C.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom). Dept. of Applied Social Studies.

 

SOURCE:                In: Mullender, A. (Editor). We Are Family: Sibling Relationships in Placement and Beyond. British Agencies for Adoption and Fostering, London (United Kingdom)., 1999;  p. 595

 

ABSTRACT:           Data from a study of the family relationships of children in care were analyzed to examine the effects of separation from siblings and the feelings of children about placement, leaving brothers and sisters behind in the home, maintaining contact with adopted siblings, and the impact of separation on identity. Of the 62 children in the study, 25 had siblings, but were placed alone, 15 were placed with some siblings, and 14 were placed with all of their siblings. The remaining 8 were only children, thus placed alone. At the time the study ended, more than half of the children with siblings in other living situations had no contact with those brothers and sisters. Possible reasons for the lack of contact include social workers assessments that contact would disrupt placement and the failure of adoptive families to follow through with contact plans. Some of the nine youth who participated in a qualitative interview for the study indicated that their relationships with their siblings were more important to them than contact with their parents, even if they had lost contact with those brothers and sisters. Those who left siblings in an abusive home were concerned about their safety and felt a sense of guilt or responsibility for their situation. Separation was associated with the loss of a sense of belonging and support that could have eased difficult experiences in care. 43 references and 2 tables.

 

KEY TERMS:         foster care research;  adoption research;  sibling relationships;  separation;  sequelae;  family relationships;  identity development;  child development

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Chapter in Book

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.baaf.org.uk

 

 

TITLE:                    Planning for Sibling Continuity Within Permanency: Needs Led or Needs Unmet.

 

AUTHOR:               Ellison, M.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Sunderland Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Social Policy and Sociology.

 

SOURCE:                In: Mullender, A. (Editor). We Are Family: Sibling Relationships in Placement and Beyond. British Agencies for Adoption and Fostering, London (United Kingdom)., 1999;  p. 596

 

ABSTRACT:           The case files of 180 children in care in Great Britain were reviewed to examine the needs of children and actual practice regarding sibling placement, contact, and sibling continuity planning. The case reviews were supplemented by interviews with parents, children, social workers, foster parents, and other care professionals. Caseworkers reported that sibling continuity planning was difficult because of the lack of placements for larger sibling groups and children with special needs, as well as the lack of cooperation from adoptive parents. Other factors contributing to sibling contact were the content of the current plan, the purpose of placement, and the type of placement recommended in care plans. For example, 75 percent ofthe children placed in short-term arrangements with the goal of family reunification were usually placed with their siblings. However, half of the children in long-term placement were separated from their brothers and sisters and two-thirds of the children with an adoption goal were separated from at least some of their siblings. These findings are in contradiction to the results of studies that have demonstrated the importance of attachment and sibling relationships in the self-concept and adjustment abilities of children in long-term placement and adoption. The chapter recommends a greater emphasis on prevention and sibling continuity, especially in long-term placements, as well as the expansion of placements for sibling groups and children with special needs. 29 references and 2 figures.

 

KEY TERMS:         siblings;  sibling relationships;  permanency planning;  great britain;  foster care research;  adoption research;  decision making;  case studies

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Chapter in Book

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.baaf.org.uk

 

 

TITLE:                    A 'For Ever and Ever Family:' Siblings' Views as Represented in Reports for Adoption Hearings.

 

AUTHOR:               Selwyn, J.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Bristol Univ. (United Kingdom). Family Policy and Child Welfare Research Centre.

 

SOURCE:                In: Mullender, A. (Editor). We Are Family: Sibling Relationships in Placement and Beyond. British Agencies for Adoption and Fostering, London (United Kingdom)., 1999;  p. 597

 

ABSTRACT:           The adoption case files of 32 children from sibling groups were reviewed to examine the extent that the opinions of siblings were considered during adoption hearings. Although the British Schedule 2 report requires that the wishes and feelings of children regarding adoption and religious and cultural issues be indicated on the form, the case review revealed few direct comments from children. Social workers often used the section of the form to highlight the foster carers' perceptions,the placement history of the child, and therapeutic interventions. Even the guardians who were specifically appointed to interview children failed to accurately represent the concerns and needs expressed by the children. None of the guardians or social workers asked the children about their relationships with their siblings or their feelings about brothers and sisters still living in an abusive home. At most, general statements were made about the views of the children, and siblings were not treated asindividuals. Guardians and social workers are urged to comply with the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child and the British Adoption Act so that children's input can improve the decisions made about their placement. 8 references.

 

KEY TERMS:         siblings;  sibling relationships;  adoption research;  childs attitudes;  child advocacy;  guardians at litem;  hearings;  legal processes

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Chapter in Book

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.baaf.org.uk

 

 

TITLE:                    Assessing Childhood Parentification: Guidelines for Researchers and Clinicians.

 

AUTHOR:               Jurkovic, G. J.;  Morrell, R.;  Thirkield, A.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Georgia State Univ., Atlanta. Dept. of Psychology.

 

SOURCE:                In: Chase, N. D. (Editor). Burdened Children: Theory, Research, and Treatment of Parentification. Sage Publications, Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA., June 1999;  p. 640

 

ABSTRACT:           This chapter identifies the characteristics and contextual properties of parentification and reviews the appropriateness of various methods for assessing family boundaries. Suggested variables for assessment include degree of overtness of the child's responsibilities; type of role expected of the child; the extent of responsibility; and the object of concern for the child. Assessments should also consider the age appropriateness of the responsibilities, internalization by the child, boundaries, social legitimacy, and ethicality and fairness. Existing tools for evaluating parentification in family relationships include interviews, self-report measures, projective scales, and behavioral observation. Limitations of the instruments and recommendations for the development and revision of assessment tools are described in the chapter. 74 references.

 

KEY TERMS:         childs role;  role reversal;  assessment;  cultural sensitivity;  definitions;  family assessment;  family relationships;  evaluation methods

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Chapter in Book

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.sagepub.com/

 

 

TITLE:                    Kinship Care as a Child Welfare Service: What Do We Really Know?

 

AUTHOR:               Gleason, J. P.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Illinois Univ., Chicago. Jane Addams Coll. of Social Work.

 

SOURCE:                In: Gleason, J.; Hairston, C. F. (Editors). Kinship Care: Improving Practice Through Research. Child Welfare League of America, Washington, DC., 1999;  p. 649

 

ABSTRACT:           This introductory chapter summarizes the research literature on kinship care in seven areas: demographics and caseload growth; policy studies and debates; caseload dynamics and pathways to permanence; definitions and implementation of best practice; child safety and well being; parents of children in kinship foster care; and caregiving experiences and consequences. In general, the findings indicate that children in kinship care remain in state custody longer than children placed with non-relatives. Although reunification for children in kinship care takes longer than for children in regular foster care, the reunifications of children who were placed with relatives are more successful. Typical research methods include analysis of administrative data, case record reviews, surveys, interviews, and assessments of functioning. The chapter highlights the important findings and identifies areas for further investigation. Numerous references.

 

KEY TERMS:         kinship care;  child welfare services;  research reviews;  demography;  trend analysis;  public policy;  best practices;  permanency planning

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Chapter in Book

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.cwla.org

 

 

TITLE:                    Defining Best Practice in Kinship Care Through Research and Demonstration.

 

AUTHOR:               Bonecutter, F. J.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Illinois Univ., Chicago. Jane Addams Coll. of Social Work.

 

SOURCE:                In: Gleason, J.; Hairston, C. F. (Editors). Kinship Care: Improving Practice Through Research. Child Welfare League of America, Washington, DC., 1999;  p. 651

 

ABSTRACT:           The Children's Bureau funded a demonstration project in Illinois to identify and test best practices for achieving permanency for children placed in kinship care. The project was conducted in three phases. During Phase One, information about current practices in kinship care case management was collected from a review of case records and interviews with caseworkers and supervisors. The project steering committee analyzed the information from the research to identify barriers to permanency, as well as practices that promote stability for children. The practices emphasize a broad view of the family, cultural competency, collaborative decision making, and the empowerment of the kinship care network. Caseworkers selected to demonstrate the model attended four half-day training sessions and a series of case consultations. Their supervisors also received consultation services to help them support the caseworkers as they implemented the practice principles. During Phase Three,cases managed by the demonstration group were compared with cases handled by workers who had not attended the training. Data collected six months after worker training revealed no difference between the groups in the achievement of permanency goals. In addition, few of the practice principles were utilized by the caseworkers. These findings reflect a high rate of turnover among caseworkers and slow court processes in Cook County. The implications of the research are described in the chapter. 17 references and 6 tables.

 

KEY TERMS:         kinship care;  best practices;  research methodology;  demonstration programs;  permanency planning;  program models;  professional training;  cultural competency

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Chapter in Book

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.cwla.org

 

 

TITLE:                    The Well-Being of Children in Kinship Foster Care.

 

AUTHOR:               Altshuler, S. J.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Illinois Univ., Urbana-Champaign. Dept. of Social Work.

 

SOURCE:                In: Gleason, J.; Hairston, C. F. (Editors). Kinship Care: Improving Practice Through Research. Child Welfare League of America, Washington, DC., 1999;  p. 653

 

ABSTRACT:           Data collected during the Achieving Permanency for Children in Kinship Foster Care project were analyzed to identify the factors that influence the well-being of kinship children. Variables included the child's case history, parental characteristics, caregiver's characteristics, and the level of involvement of the child in decisions about placement. In addition to the quantitative analysis, qualitative information was obtained from interviews with children about their foster care experience. Eighty-nine percent of the 77 children studied were reported by caseworkers to be in good health. The quantitative data revealed an association between poor child health and three variables: mother's homelessness; mother's single parenthood; and caregiver problems. Interviews with the children found that love and care provided by kinship parents, the involvement of the children in their families, and opportunities for communication resulted in more positive outcomes. Implications of these findings for policy and future research are briefly discussed in the chapter. 61 references and 7 tables.

 

KEY TERMS:         kinship care;  foster children;  well being;  family characteristics;  genogram;  foster parents;  decision making;  individual characteristics

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Chapter in Book

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.cwla.org

 

 

TITLE:                    Attachment Disturbances and Disorders in Children Exposed to Early Severe Deprivation.

 

AUTHOR:               O'Connor, T. G.;  Bredenkamp, D.;  Rutter, M.;  Anderson-Wood, L.;  et al.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Infant Mental Health Journal

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Institute of Psychiatry, London (United Kingdom). Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Research Centre.

 

SOURCE:                20(1): pp. 10-29;  John Wiley and Sons Inc., New York, NY., Spring 1999;  p. 756

 

ABSTRACT:           Evidence of attachment disorder behaviors was examined in a sample of 111 children who experienced institutional upbringing and were later adopted into the United Kingdom, and a comparison sample of 52 intracountry adopted children not exposed to early deprivation. All children were 4 years of age at the time of assessment. Information was obtained from a semistructured interview with the parent, questionnaires, and direct assessment of children. Results indicated that attachment disorder behaviors were positively associated with duration of severe deprivation, but a substantial number of children exposed to even prolonged severe early privation did not exhibit these symptoms. Retrospective parental reports further indicated thatchildren with concurrent disturbances in attachment behavior were likely to have displayed disturbances early on (i.e., at placement), but there was also considerable evidence for discontinuity. The discussion focuses on how these findings address conceptual and diagnostic issues of attachment disorder. In addition, case illustrations are offered to extend the empirical findings and to highlight central aspects of attachment disorder that require further attention. 45 references, 1 figure, and 2 tables. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         attachment disorder;  etiology;  great britain;  intercountry adoption;  institutionalized children;  attachment behavior;  adoption research;  institutional abuse and neglect

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.wiley.com

 

 

TITLE:                    Adoption and Subsidized Guardianship as Permanency Options in Kinship Foster Care: Barriers and Facilitating Conditions.

 

AUTHOR:               Mason, S. J.;  Gleeson, J. P.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Illinois Univ., Chicago. Dept. of Clinical Social Work in Psychiatry.

 

SOURCE:                In: Gleason, J.; Hairston, C. F. (Editors). Kinship Care: Improving Practice Through Research. Child Welfare League of America, Washington, DC., 1999;  p. 775

 

ABSTRACT:           A qualitative study of caseworkers in Illinois was conducted in 1997 to identify barriers and conditions that support permanency for children in foster care. The study was intended to inform several initiatives and policies designed to promote permanency planning in the state. Data were collected during subsidized guardianship waiver demonstration planning meetings; staff meetings; training programs for caseworkers on decision-making related to permanency; informal discussions with caseworkers; and interview questionnaires. Agency administrators, supervisors, and caseworkers demonstrated a commitment to permanency planning, especially adoption. Performance-based contracting and the Court Improvement Project were identified by the study participants as motivating influences. Barriers to permanency included family dynamics, caseworker bias, caseworker knowledge and skills, failure to apply nonadversarial strategies, limited resources, the culture of the child welfare system, the legal system, and procedures. These findings illustrate the importance of strong leadership, professional training, casework supervision, support for supervisors, and community-based services. 28 references.

 

KEY TERMS:         adoption;  subsidized guardianship;  kinship care;  permanency planning;  barriers;  predictor variables;  decision making;  illinois

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Chapter in Book

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.cwla.org

 

 

TITLE:                    Child Rearing Perspectives of Grandparent Caregivers.

 

AUTHOR:               Osby, O.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Illinois Univ., Chicago. Jane Addams Coll. of Social Work.

 

SOURCE:                In: Gleason, J.; Hairston, C. F. (Editors). Kinship Care: Improving Practice Through Research. Child Welfare League of America, Washington, DC., 1999;  p. 776

 

ABSTRACT:           Ten grandparent kinship caregivers were interviewed for this study to examine the reasons for placement and the world views of grandparents who take on parenting responsibilities for their grandchildren. The ethnographic interview facilitated information-sharing about the grandparents' background, life experiences, child rearing beliefs, and values regarding family and home. Perceptions of the legal and child welfare systems and recommendations for reform were also solicited. Mostreported that they agreed to take care of their grandchild or great-grandchild because of the substance abuse or maltreatment behavior of the child's parents. Many of the grandparents had taken care of the child before. Some believed that their role in life was to care for children, while others resisted the responsibility. Few could name other relatives who could care for the children. Caregivers who did have support from family members were the most satisfied with their role. Other caregivers had no support from the family, friends, church, or community and felt very isolated. Many of the grandparents expressed frustration with the court process and the rights retained by the parents. Some felt that the rules and regulations for kinship care providers were too restrictive and that their parenting experience was not valued. This world view analysis can be used to inform assessment procedures, formulate a relevant service plan, and create innovative interventions. 13 references.

 

KEY TERMS:         kinship care;  grandparents;  child rearing;  parenting;  parental attitudes;  child welfare services;  family support systems;  case studies

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Chapter in Book

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.cwla.org

 

 

TITLE:                    Participation in Retrospective Child Sexual Abuse Research: Beneficial or Harmful? What Women Think Six Years Later.

 

AUTHOR:               Martin, J. L.;  Perrott, K.;  Morris, E. M.;  Romans, S. E.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Otago Medical School, Dunedin (New Zealand).

 

SOURCE:                In: Williams, L. M. and Banyard, V. L. (Editors). Trauma and Memory. Thousand Oaks, CA, Sage Publications, Inc., 1999;  pp. 149-159

 

ABSTRACT:           This chapter describes the findings of a qualitative study that measured the impact of participation in sexual abuse research. A total of 354 women were interviewed 6 years after they participated in a study about the prevalence and effects of child sexual abuse. The sample included women with and without a history of child sexual abuse. Interviews focused on memories of the last interview and comfort with discussing sexual abuse experiences. Women without a history of child sexual abuse were highly comfortable discussing abuse, while survivors of sexual abuse were moderately comfortable with the topic. Half of all the women indicated that the original interview was a positive experience and 21 participants reported that it was a negative experience. Abused women were more likely to rate the interview as positive. Ethical implications of these findings for future research are discussed. 12 references and 3 figures.

 

KEY TERMS:         sexual abuse;  adults abused as children;  research methodology;  sequelae;  interviews;  memory;  trauma;  ethics

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Chapter in Book

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.sagepub.com/

 

 

TITLE:                    The Criminal Justice System and Child Placement in Child Sexual Abuse Cases.

 

AUTHOR:               Cross. T. P.;  Martell, D.;  McDonald, E.;  Ahl, M.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Maltreatment

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA. Family and Children's Policy Center.

 

SOURCE:                4(1): pp. 32-44;  Thousand Oaks, CA, Sage Publications, Inc., February 1999

 

ABSTRACT:           This study examines the relationship between declining to prosecute child sexual abuse and child placement. All cases involving child sexual abuse charges referred to prosecutors in four jurisdictions across the country are tracked. A sample of the child victims and families from these cases were interviewed at the time of referral for prosecution and eight to nine months later, and data on life events, including child placement, maternal support, and child and family adjustment were gathered. In cases declined for prosecution, 41 percent of children were placed outside the home since the first interview, as compared to 19 percent of children in accepted cases. A multivariate analysis demonstrated that children were significantly more likely to be placed outside the home when alleged abuse lasted for more than one month, families were more disturbed, maternal support was less, and cases were declined for prosecution. Possible explanations for the relationship between prosecution and child placement are discussed, as well as recommendations for practice and further research. 5 tables, numerous references. (Author abstract modified)

 

KEY TERMS:         sexual abuse;  criminal justice system;  child placement

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.sagepub.com/

 

 

TITLE:                    Emotional Congruence in Sexual Offenders Against Children.

 

AUTHOR:               Wilson, R. J.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Correctional Service of Canada, Toronto, ON (Canada).

 

SOURCE:                11(1): pp. 33-47;  New York, NY, Plenum Publishing Corp., January 1999

 

ABSTRACT:           This study evaluated the emotional congruence in 194 men, including 41 homosexual pedophiles, 31 heterosexual pedophiles, 62 heterosexual nonpedophilic incest offenders, 27 sexual offenders against women, and 33 nonsexual offender criminals. A revised version of the Child Identification Scale (CIS-R) was used in combination with a semi-structured interview also intended to measure the construct. Maximum-likelihood factor analysis of the CIS-R generated eight factors. All subjects, particularly the nonsexual offenders, scored high on a factor indicating a wish to restart their lives. With respect to emotional congruence, results indicated that only the homosexual pedophiles' scores showed a preference for interacting with children on the child's level, while the incest offenders seemed to prefer to elevate their victims to adult status rather than fixating on the child role themselves. The group of heterosexual pedophiles, however, seemed to be motivated more by sexual gratification than by an emotional or relationship interest in their victims or children. 12 references and 2 tables. (Author abstract modified)

 

KEY TERMS:         sex offenders;  characteristics of abuser;  child abuse research;  sexual abuse;  incest;  pedophilia

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.plenum.com

 

 

TITLE:                    The Relationship Between Child Sexual Abuse and Major Depression Among Low-Income Women: A Function of Growing Up Experiences?

 

AUTHOR:               Zuravin, S. J.;  Fontanella, C.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Maltreatment

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Maryland Univ., Baltimore. School of Social Work.

 

SOURCE:                4(1): pp. 3-12;  Thousand Oaks, CA, Sage Publications, Inc., February 1999

 

ABSTRACT:           This article on the adult sequelae of child sexual abuse (CSA) focused on identifying the rate of major depression among adult survivors and testing the third variable hypothesis that the relationship between CSA and major depression is spurious, a function of other adverse growing up experiences. Subjects included 513 low-income women, of whom 105 had experienced contact sexual abuse. Information on depression was collected with the Depression Module from the Diagnostic Interview Schedule, Third Edition, Revised. Third variables included 11 markers of negative growing up experiences including four types of child maltreatment: emotional neglect; physical abuse; physical neglect; and verbal abuse. Findings revealed that CSA victims were almost three times as likely to be depressed as comparison women and failed to support the third variable hypothesis. CSA accounted for variance in the major depression over and above other adverse growing up experiences. Discussion focuses on recommendations for future study. 51 references and 2 tables. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         sexual abuse;  adults abused as children;  sequelae;  depression;  female victims;  low income groups;  child development;  family characteristics

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.sagepub.com/

 

 

TITLE:                    The Role of the Medical Examination in Assessment of Child Sexual Abuse in South Australia.

 

AUTHOR:               Blake, G. P.;  McGregor, K. J.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Journal of Child Sexual Abuse

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Flinders Medical Centre, Adelaide, SA (Australia). Dept. of Paediatrics and Child Health.

 

SOURCE:                7(3): pp. 89-96;  Binghamton, NY, Haworth Press, Inc., 1999

 

ABSTRACT:           This article explains the child-oriented medical examination procedures of the Child Protection Service at Flinders Medical Center. Families referred to the center receive services from a multidisciplinary team of psychologists, social workers, a research officer, and medical professionals. Psychologists or social workers interview children and their caregivers about the suspected abuse and offer each family the opportunity for a medical examination. The examination is conducted by pediatric consultants or specialists who are experienced in the identification of sexual abuse. Timing depends on the urgency of the situation and the best interests of the child. Procedures include a general medical history, general pediatric examination, and a genital examination after careful preparation of the child. Findings from the medical examination are combined with the psychosocial assessment in the report to the authorities. The medical examination process emphasizes treating the child as a person and not an object from which evidence can be extracted. Although the medical examination may not yield any physical evidence for sexual abuse, it still has a significant role in the overall assessment, assisting the child to see his or herself as more than a victim, and understand that healing can occur. Clear communication between doctors and non- medical professionals is essential to ensure that medical findings are correctly interpreted. 14 references and 2 tables. (Author abstract modified)

 

KEY TERMS:         australia;  sexual abuse;  assessment;  physical examinations;  medical aspects of child abuse;  physicians role;  child protective services;  multidisciplinary teams

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.haworthpressinc.com

 

 

TITLE:                    Male Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse: A Qualitative Study and Issues for Clinical Consideration.

 

AUTHOR:               Gill, M.;  Tutty, L. M.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Journal of Child Sexual Abuse

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Calgary Counselling Centre, Alberta (Canada).

 

SOURCE:                7(3): pp. 19-33;  Binghamton, NY, Haworth Press, Inc., 1999

 

ABSTRACT:           This qualitative study explored the effects of childhood sexual abuse with 10 adult male survivors. The men who participated in the research were largely motivated by their perception that North American society does not acknowledge the sexual abuse of boys. The non-acceptance of the sexual abuse of boys and social expectations of men as in control and aggressive significantly affected the sexual identity, as well as the emotional and sexual relationships, of the study participants as adults. The implications of these issues for clinical intervention are described. Therapists are advised to facilitate disclosure of abuse and the acknowledgement of the long-term effects of that abuse. Narrative therapy can be used to address cultural expectations of men and enhance self-esteem. Finally, relationship issues, including abusive behavior by the survivor, should be resolved as the survivor becomes more comfortable with his identity. 43 references. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         adults abused as children;  male victims;  sexual abuse;  child abuse research;  sequelae;  qualitative research;  interviews;  emotional problems

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.haworthpressinc.com

 

 

TITLE:                    Repeated Sexual Victimization and Mental Disorders in Women.

 

AUTHOR:               Arata, C. M.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Journal of Child Sexual Abuse

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    University of South Alabama, Mobile. Dept. of Psychology.

 

SOURCE:                7(3): pp. 1-17;  Binghamton, NY, Haworth Press, Inc., 1999

 

ABSTRACT:           The present study explored the role of repeated sexual victimization in producing increased risk for mental disorders, relative to adult-only or child-only sexual victimization. Ninety-two females completed questionnaires about trauma history and sexual victimization history. Diagnostic interviews were completed to assess for mental disorders. Posttraumatic stress disorder was the only mental disorder which was found to differentiate between women with repeated victimization versus child-only or adult-only sexual assault. The results were limited by small sample size, but suggest the need to consider adult revictimization as a contributing factor to posttraumatic stress disorder related to child sexual abuse. 33 references, 1 figure, and 2 tables. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         female victims;  adults abused as children;  sexual abuse;  rape;  revictimization;  child abuse research;  mental disorders;  posttraumatic stress disorder

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.haworthpressinc.com

 

 

TITLE:                    Inappropriate Child Rearing Practices as Perceived by Jewish Immigrant Parents From the Former Societ Union.

 

AUTHOR:               Shor, R.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Abuse and Neglect

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Hebrew Univ., Mt. Scopus, Jerusalem (Israel). Paul Baerwald School of Social Work.

 

SOURCE:                23(5): pp. 487-499;  New York, NY, Elsevier Science Ltd., May 1999

 

ABSTRACT:           This study explored the perceptions of Jewish immigrant parents from the Former Soviet Union about appropriate and inappropriate child rearing practices and help seeking preferences in situations of children at risk. Interviews with 273 immigrant parents were conducted in Israel. A semi- structured questionnaire included seven vignettes which related to three areas of parental behaviors: lack of provision of child's needs; corporal punishment; and psychological punishment. In addition, open-ended questions were included about the participants' personal beliefs regarding the use of physical punishment towards children. The findings suggest a concrete and practical approach towards child rearing practices, support for the utilization of certain types of corporal and psychological punishment, consideration of the gender of the child regarding corporal punishment, a perception of children as self sufficient at a fairly young age, and a tendency not to cooperate with outsiders in situations of children at risk. Even though Jewish immigrants from the Former Soviet Union might be in a new country for several years, their background may still have a significant role in their child rearing practices and help seeking patterns. Awareness of their perceptions could provide information which is significant for the accurate assessment of situational abuse and neglect among the immigrants and for defining appropriate treatment objectives and means for achieving change. 24 references and 5 tables. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         israel;  child rearing;  parental attitudes;  immigrants;  cultural values;  corporal punishment;  intervention strategies;  child welfare research

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    Child Maltreatment: An Introduction.

 

AUTHOR:               Miller-Perrin, C. L.;  Perrin, R. D.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Pepperdine Univ., Malibu, CA. Dept. of Psychology.

 

SOURCE:                Thousand Oaks, CA, Sage Publications, Inc., March 1999;  360 pp.

 

ABSTRACT:           This textbook for undergraduate and first year graduate students provides an overview of the causes, effects, and treatment of child abuse and neglect. The first two chapters review the definitions of child maltreatment and the theoretical and methodological issues of research. Historical perspectives, official estimates of prevalence, and research methods are discussed. The remaining chapters focus on the specific types of maltreatment: physical; sexual; neglect and psychological maltreatment; and other abusive situations. Each chapter begins with the transcript of an interview with a prominent child abuse expert, and then outlines the scope of the problem, characteristics of victims and perpetrators, dynamics of abuse, consequences, and treatment interventions. Prevention and models for future research are explained in the final chapter. Section summaries highlight the important concepts. Numerous references, 2 figures, and 18 tables.

 

KEY TERMS:         definitions;  physical abuse;  sexual abuse;  psychological abuse;  child neglect;  prevention;  professional training;  models

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Book

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.sagepub.com/

 

 

TITLE:                    An Exchange on Juvenile Out-of-Home Placement: A Program Evaluation With Joel Alter, Office of the Legislative Auditor.

 

AUTHOR:               Wattenberg, E.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    CASCW News

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Center for Advanced Studies in Child Welfare.

 

SOURCE:                (13);  Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Center for Advanced Studies in Child Welfare, March 1999, February 22, 1999;  6 pp.

 

ABSTRACT:           The findings of an evaluation of juvenile out-of-home placement services in Minnesota are summarized in this interview with the author of the report. The Office of the Legislative Auditor collected data about out-of-home placements from statewide information sources and surveys of county corrections supervisors, human services directors, and district court judges. The study identified three groups of children at risk of out-of-home placement: children who are removed from their home because of parental behavior; children who have committed crimes or exhibited behavior problems; and children who have poor relationships with their family. In 1997, children removed from their home because of parental behavior accounted for more than half of all out-of-home care days utilized. Thirty-six percent of out-of-home care days were spent on children placed for delinquency or behavior problems, and 5 percent of days were used for children who did not get along with their family. Correctional supervisors tended to have more confidence in the decisions made by judges about placement than the human service directors did. Both groups would like the state to consider establishing more non-residential services, such as home-based services, intensive probation, and outpatient programs, as an alternative to restrictive placements. About half of the corrections supervisors and human service directors surveyed reported that budget restrictions have limited the types of services that they can afford to provide. Aftercare was specifically cited as a necessary service. The interview also reviews study findings regarding overlap between the three target populations, identification of program goals, the role of treatment foster care, and the proportion of children of color.

 

KEY TERMS:         program evaluation;  minnesota;  out of home care;  foster care;  correctional institutions;  courts role;  cost effectiveness;  funding

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Special Issue

 

INTERNET URL:   http://ssw.che.umn.edu/cascw

 

 

TITLE:                    Juvenile Out-of-Home Placement: A Program Evaluation Report.

 

INST. AUTHOR:    Minnesota State Office of the Legislative Auditor, St. Paul.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

SOURCE:                Minnesota State Office of the Legislative Auditor, St. Paul, January 1999;  139 pp.

 

ABSTRACT:           The 1998 Minnesota legislature requested this evaluation of out-of-home placement services in the state. The study examined how decisions are made, total cost of out-of-home placements, demographics of children in placement, types of facilities used, need for more services, and the status of information about the effectiveness of the placement system. Statewide trends, differences in spending between counties, funding sources, reasons for placement, length of placement, and outcome measurement were also reviewed. Data obtained from statewide information sources, interviews with public officials, and case records revealed three reasons for out-of-home placement: parental behavior (child abuse and neglect, substance abuse, disability); child misconduct (delinquency, substance abuse, behavior problems); and family interaction problems. Significantly more human service directors than corrections supervisors reported that judges' decisions are inconsistent, primarily because few counties consider input from social service staff when making placement determinations. A total of $225 million was spent on out-of-home placements in 1997, with 59 percent funded by county revenues, 20 percent federal revenues, and 12 percent state revenues. However, these proportions varied by county. Human service directors and corrections supervisors identified the need for more non- residential services. Both samples indicated that some out-of- home placements could be prevented if more non-residential services were available. Respondents also reported a need for aftercare services, especially for correctional and substance abuse programs. The study recommends that the state require counties to utilize multi-disciplinary teams to screen juveniles entering placement. Courts should identify placement goals and case plans as part of the disposition. Guidelines for best practices should also be distributed to the staff of the Department of Human Services and the Department of Corrections. 10 figures and 40 tables.

 

KEY TERMS:         program evaluation;  minnesota;  out of home care;  foster care;  correctional institutions;  courts role;  cost effectiveness;  funding

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Technical Report

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.auditor.leg.state.mn.us

 

 

TITLE:                    Corporal Punishment Cessation: Social Contexts and Parents' Experiences.

 

AUTHOR:               Davis, P. W.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Journal of Interpersonal Violence

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Georgia State Univ., Atlanta. Dept. of Sociology.

 

SOURCE:                14(5): pp. 492-510;  Thousand Oaks, CA, Sage Publications, Inc., May 1999

 

ABSTRACT:           This article examines the cessation of corporal punishment by parents who start out spanking their children and then make a concerted effort to stop. Drawing on semistructured interviews with 22 parents, the qualitative analysis identifies five contexts in which those concerted efforts arose: experiential; ideological; regulatory; relational; and biographical. The key features of each context are discussed, and case descriptions are provided. Although parents' reasons for quitting vary, cessation is generally associated with new meanings that turn old beliefs into excuses and that define nonspanking as progress. It is argued that cessation should be conceptualized as a social process and as part of a corporal punishment career and not simply as a behavioral omission. These data suggest that cultural inducements and social support may be as important as learning alternative disciplinary techniques in explaining parents' cessation efforts. The implications for a better understanding of reductions in corporal punishment are discussed. 40 references and 1 table. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         corporal punishment;  prevention;  child abuse research;  social values;  social attitudes;  discipline;  parenting;  parental reactions

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.sagepub.com/

 

 

TITLE:                    Behavioral and Verbal Responses of Unabused Externalizing Children to Anatomically Detailed Doll Interviews.

 

AUTHOR:               Weill, R.;  Dawson, B. L.;  Range, L. M.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Journal of Family Violence

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg. Dept. of Psychology.

 

SOURCE:                14(1): pp. 61-70;  New York, NY, Kluwer Academic-Plenum Publishers, March 1999

 

ABSTRACT:           To see if unabused children with externalizing behavior problems display more sexual behaviors and verbalizations than other children in their interactions with anatomically detailed dolls, 16 children aged 3 to 6 years old were compared with 44 non-externalizing controls. The children were recruited from nursery schools, day care facilities, and kindergarten programs in southern Mississippi. A 5-phase structured, detailed interview, and comprehensive coding of videotapes by external raters, was completed on 17 behaviors and verbalizations. Externalizing children exhibited more overall activity than non-externalizing children. Also, externalizing children exhibited more behavioral sexual aggression during the body inventory phase, but no other differences in sexual behaviors or verbalizations occurred. Results suggest that most normative data on anatomical dolls generalize to externalizing children. An appendix lists the behavioral and verbal coding categories used in the study. 2 tables and numerous references. (Author abstract modified

 

KEY TERMS:         anatomical dolls;  behavior problems;  sexual behavior;  aggressive behavior;  interviews;  mississippi

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.wkap.com

 

 

TITLE:                    Michigan Child Welfare Law Source Book.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

SOURCE:                Michigan Child Welfare Law Resource Center, Ann Arbor, February 15, 1999

 

ABSTRACT:           This book details Michigan's child welfare laws. Michigan Child Protection Laws are reviewed first and include definitions; required reports of child abuse or neglect and disposition; required reports of controlled substances in the bodies of newborn infants; reports by those not required to report; reporting person's identity, immunity from liability, and good faith; detention, examination and medical evaluation of child; records, confidentiality, availability, child abuse, notice, amendment, expunction, hearings; availability of information to select committee and confidentiality; child fatality review team; release of information by Freedom of Information Act and determination of child's best interest; release of specified information by director; criteria by which director shall not release specified information; notice required after director's decision to grant or release specified information; fees for copy of specified information; investigations; individuals bound over for certain crimes, notices, confidentiality; referral to prosecuting attorney; interview of child; response following investigation determined by category; professional services, continuing education, information for general public; contents of agency's annual report of legislature; legal counsel for child; attorney-client privilege; reports to law enforcement officials or probate court; hospitals, schools, or other agencies, investigations of reported claims of child abuse or neglect by employees; failure to report, failure to expunge record, false report; religious beliefs precluding conditions for filing of petitions. Statutes contained in the Michigan Juvenile Code are detailed next followed by sections on selected guardianship provisions, Children's Ombudsman Act, Foster Care Review Board Act, and the Foster Care and Adoption Services Act. The book also contains Michigan's court rules, child protection jury instructions, and rules of evidence.

 

KEY TERMS:         michigan;  child protection laws;  guardianship;  foster care;  rules of evidence;  state laws;  child welfare

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Book

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.law.umich.edu/childlaw

 

 

TITLE:                    Confronting Child Maltreatment Through Recreation.

 

AUTHOR:               Jewell, D. L.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    New York State Univ., Brockport. Dept. of Recreation and Leisure Studies.

 

SOURCE:                Second Edition. Springfield, IL, Charles C. Thomas Publisher, Ltd., 1999;  376 pp.

 

ABSTRACT:           This book, directed at recreation and leisure professionals, addresses the roles of intervention, prevention, and treatment of child maltreatment. The book helps expand the recreation professional's role as an advocate for children. The author defines maltreatment as abuse and neglect and it refers to actions or failures to act by those responsible for the care and nurturance of children-- parents, daycare workers, teachers, scout leaders, playground leaders, or others who by virtue of their positions children are taught to trust. The book consists of 17 chapters and 9 appendices. Statistics on the incidence of abuse and neglect are provided as are excerpts from newspaper articles that show the frequency of maltreatment. Information is provided to assist in the intervention of maltreatment. The characteristics and signs of possible maltreatment are identified with the goal of diminishing the reluctance of some individuals to intervene that results from the ignorance of the signals provided by both the victims and the perpetrators. An overview of the cost of maltreatment to the individual victims and society, in terms of dollars and personal impact, is given. The text provides guidelines for the selection of recreation and leisure services personnel and addresses the rationale for careful staff selection, qualities personnel should possess, and the application and selection process. Reporting of suspected child maltreatment is also reviewed. Being mandated reporters, recreation and leisure services personnel will be able to assist law enforcement and child protective services investigators, as well as the suspected victim, by making the written report as comprehensive as possible. As the individual the suspected victim may trust, the employee may be able to secure information the child may be reluctant to share with the child protective service and law enforcement staff. It may be necessary to interview the child and one of the chapters provides guidance for conducting such an interview. The book suggests programs, activities, and support services recreation and leisure services agencies may offer to prevent and treat maltreatment. Numerous tables and references.

 

KEY TERMS:         recreational programs;  intervention;  mandatory reporting;  child advocacy;  prevention

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Book

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.ccthomas.com

 

 

TITLE:                    The Health Care Provider's Role in the Disclosure of Sexual Abuse: The Medical Interview as the Gateway to Disclosure.

 

AUTHOR:               Diaz, A.;  Manigat, N.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Children's Health Care

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY.

 

SOURCE:                28(2): pp. 141-149;  Mahwah, NJ, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., Spring 1999

 

ABSTRACT:           This article examines the impact of a direct questioning approach as part of an adolescent medical screening procedure to facilitate the disclosure of sexual abuse. Findings suggest the efficacy of direct questioning to increase disclosures of sexual abuse that may have otherwise gone undetected. Implications for adolescents' acceptance of psychotherapy and other follow-up referral resources are also discussed. 26 references. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         physicians role;  health personnel;  disclosure;  sexual abuse;  assessment;  interviews;  therapeutic intervention;  adolescents

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    Facilitating Effective Relationships Between Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse and Health Care Professionals.

 

AUTHOR:               Stalker, C. A.;  Schachter, C. L.;  Teram, E.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Affilia

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Wilfrid Laurier Univ., Waterloo, ON (Canada). Dept. of Social Work.

 

SOURCE:                14(2): pp. 176-198;  Thousand Oaks, CA, Sage Publications, Inc., Summer 1999

 

ABSTRACT:           Clients in psychotherapy related to childhood sexual abuse often consult a variety of health care professionals, including physical therapists, massage therapists, and chiropractors. On the basis of interviews with 27 women survivors of childhood sexual abuse, this article offers guidelines for facilitating the relationships between survivors and physical therapists. Awareness of the difficulties that many survivors face when receiving therapy involving touch will increase the ability of psychotherapists to help clients receive the maximum benefits from these therapies. Survivors should be encouraged to take a friend to the appointment, discuss the procedure with the clinician before treatment begins, request that the clinician explain each step, and request clothing that is comfortable and secure. 20 references. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         adults abused as children;  sexual abuse;  physician patient relationships;  worker client relationships;  health personnel;  therapists role;  social workers role

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.sagepub.com/

 

 

TITLE:                    Understanding and Reacting to the Anogenital Exam: Implications for Patient Preparation.

 

AUTHOR:               Waibel-Duncan, M. K.;  Sanger, M.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Abuse and Neglect

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Vanderbilt, Univ., Nashville, TN. George Peabody Coll.

 

SOURCE:                23(3): pp. 281-286;  New York, NY, Elsevier Science, Ltd., 1999

 

ABSTRACT:           This study documented children's and their adult guardians' anogenital exam knowledge and exam concerns and it assessed the effect of preparatory information on children's exam distress. Data from this study are intended to inform the development of more precise and effective preparatory interventions for the anogenital exam. Participants included 30 girls, ages 6 to 16 years old consecutively referred to an outpatient clinic specializing in medical evaluations of children alleged to have been sexually abused. Forty-seven percent of the girls had previous anogenital exam experience. Clinic staff used a Likert-type scale ranging from 1, meaning no distress, to 7, indicating extreme distress, to rate children's exam distress before and after the preparatory interview as well as during the exam. Most adults reported not receiving information about the exam (71 percent), not knowing enough about the exam (63 percent), and wanting more exam information (100 percent). Sixty percent of the adults who reported knowing some or a lot about the exam also said that they shared sensory and procedural exam information with their children. However, 60 percent of these same adults incorrectly assumed that the check-up included a pelvic exam. Upon arrival at the clinic, most children reported not having enough exam information (83 percent) and wanting more information. Data from this study indicate that the majority of adult respondents were inadequately prepared for their children's anogenital exams. The young patients were also poorly prepared for the anogenital exam. These data call for educating families and the broader professional community about the sensory, procedural, and psychological aspects of the anogenital exam. Recommendations for replicating this study on a larger scale are discussed. Numerous references

 

KEY TERMS:         sexual abuse;  medical examiners;  health services;  outpatient treatment;  genital injuries

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    Assistance for Special Educators, Law Enforcement, and Child Protective Services in Recognizing and Managing Abuse and Neglect of Children With Disabilities.

 

AUTHOR:               Struck, L. M.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Virginia State Dept. of Social Services, Richmond. Child Protective Services Unit.

 

SOURCE:                Virginia State Dept. of Social Services, Richmond. Child Protective Services., 1999;  116 pp.

 

ABSTRACT:           Recognizing and investigating suspected abuse or neglect of children with disabilities is a challenging task for special educators, law enforcement, and child protective services due to the subject matter; diversity of disabilities; characteristics of the disability, which can sometimes mask or mimic abuse or neglect; and social attitudes about people with disabilities. Under Virginia law, professionals are required to report suspicion of abuse or neglect to child protective services. Collaboration that capitalizes on the expertise of each of these 3 professions is essential to an objective and sensitive assessment of the situation; protection from revictimization by systems; and ensuring the safety of the child. This booklet is designed to help professionals recognize and understand abuse and neglect of children with disabilities; improve the reporting accuracy when there is suspicion of child abuse/neglect; and provide strategies for interdisciplinary collaboration that will facilitate a sensitive and effective response. The booklet contains information on: the relationship between child maltreatment and disabilities; risk factors; indicators of abuse/neglect in children with disabilities; disability types; interview techniques; Virginia child abuse and neglect laws; definitions of child abuse and neglect; issues and concerns about reporting; procedures for making a report; a brief explanation of what happens when a report is made; and abuse and neglect prevention strategies for children with disabilities. Appendices contain information on the following: glossary of disabilities; continuum of disabilities; developmental language skills; prevention curricula for children with disabilities; references; list of Virginia social services departments; and resources.

 

KEY TERMS:         children with disabilities;  virginia;  child abuse reporting;  risk factors;  indicators;  definitions;  prevention;  professionals responsibility

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Book

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.vip-view.net

 

 

TITLE:                    Knowledge of Sexual Abuse and Self-Protection Skills: A Study of Female Chinese Adolescents With Mild Mental Retardation.

 

AUTHOR:               Tang, C. S.;  Lee, Y. K.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Abuse and Neglect

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Chinese Univ., Hong Kong (China). Dept. of Psychology.

 

SOURCE:                23(3): pp. 269-279;  New York, NY, Elsevier Science, Ltd., 1999

 

ABSTRACT:           This study examined the level of sexual abuse knowledge and self-protection skills in a sample of female Chinese adolescents in Hong Kong with mild mental retardation. It was hypothesized that the participants would exhibit impoverished knowledge on sexual abuse and related self-protection strategies. A total of 77 female adolescents aged 11 to 15 years old were recruited from 4 special schools for mental retardation. The Chinese versions of the Personal Safety Questionnaire and the What If Situation Test, both developed by Wurtele, were administered orally to the participants during individual interviews. Results indicated that participants were more able to accurately recognize inappropriate than appropriate touches and sexual requests, and possessed limited information about sexual abuse. They also inadequately protected themselves against sexual abuse, and had difficulty reporting the sexually abusive incident and characteristics of the offender. Regression analyses showed that their sexual abuse knowledge was the best predictor for self-protection skills. The study findings provided strong cross-cultural support to previous Western studies that found females with mild mental retardation to be at high risk for sexual abuse and in need of specially designed prevention programs to enhance their competency against sexual victimization and exploitation. With modification and refinement, measurement scales used in the Western general population could be extended to Chinese adolescents with mental retardation. Suggestions on the design of sexual abuse prevention programs, limitations of the present study, and recommendations for future studies were also discussed. 3 tables and numerous references.

 

KEY TERMS:         sexual abuse;  child protection;  china;  adolescents;  mental retardation;  prevention programs

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    Degrees of Memory of Childhood Sexual Abuse Among Women Survivors in Therapy.

 

AUTHOR:               Gold, S. N.;  Hughes, D. M.;  Swingle, J. M.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Journal of Family Violence

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Nova Southeastern Univ., Fort Lauderdale, FL. Center for Psychological Studies.

 

SOURCE:                14(1): pp. 35-46;  New York, NY, Kluwer Academic-Plenum Publishers, March 1999

 

ABSTRACT:           Past and current memory for childhood sexual abuse reported by a clinical sample of 160 women survivors was assessed utilizing a structured clinical interview. Response alternatives for memory were ordered along a continuum. To minimize treatment effects, participants were interviewed as early in the outpatient therapy as possible. Fairly complete recollection both in the past and currently was reported by 26.3 percent of the sample, 36.9 percent apparently lost and subsequently recovered sexual abuse memories, and 36.9 percent endorsed intermediate degrees of memory. Only 2.5 percent indicated a decrease in degree of recollection over time. Age at onset was the only abuse characteristic found to differentiate participants with fairly complete memory from the rest of the sample. Findings are interpreted as illustrating that conclusions about memory for abuse are highly dependent on the way inquiries are conceptualized and worded. Limitations of the study are reviewed. 1 table, 2 figures, and numerous references. (Author abstract modified)

 

KEY TERMS:         memory;  outpatient treatment;  interviews;  sexual abuse;  adults abused as children

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.wkap.com

 

 

TITLE:                    A Child Interviewer's Guidebook.

 

AUTHOR:               Bourg, W.;  Broderick, R.;  Flagor, R.;  Kelly, D. M. et al.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    C.A.R.E.S. Northwest Program, OR.

 

SOURCE:                Thousand Oaks, CA, Sage Publications, Inc., February 1999;  267 pp.

 

ABSTRACT:           This guidebook was originally developed in Oregon at the request of the Health Advisory Council on Child Abuse. The Health Advisory Council requested that the guidelines be written to provide interviewers with a clear, accessible summary of accumulated knowledge in the field of child interviewing. The guidebook promotes consistency in the quality of care provided to children when they are evaluated for possible abuse. The guidelines are part of a training package designed to provide child abuse evaluators with essential educational resources and are intended for use among professionals working in child abuse assessment centers. The recommendations are tailored to child evaluations that concentrate on eliciting reliable statements about possible abuse and maximizing the amount of information gained from the child, given the chid's age, circumstances, and readiness to talk. Although the guidelines focus on child sexual abuse, the principles are applicable to conversing and interviewing children about physical abuse as well as exposure to any risk factor, including domestic violence, parental drug and alcohol abuse, neglect, and witnessing a crime. The guidebook is divided into 19 chapters with 3 sections: getting ready for the child interview, basic interviewing skills, and specialty issues. Appendices contain the following information: core literature for child interviewers; C.A.R.E.S. (Child Abuse Response and Evaluation Services) Northwest Program social history questionnaire; sources for dolls and drawings; and C.A.R.E.S. protective order. Numerous references.

 

KEY TERMS:         interviews;  evaluation;  oregon;  documentation;  sexual abuse;  guidelines

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Book

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.sagepub.com/

 

 

TITLE:                    Psychological Impact of Childhood Sexual Abuse on Male Inmates: The Importance of Perception.

 

AUTHOR:               Fondacaro, K. M.;  Holt, J. C.;  Powell, T. A.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Abuse and Neglect

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Vermont Univ., Burlington. Dept. of Psychology.

 

SOURCE:                23(4): pp. 361-369;  New York, NY, Elsevier Science, April 1999

 

ABSTRACT:           This study examined the association between childhood sexual victimization and adult psychiatric disorders among male inmates. It further assessed the association between the perception of an event (as sexual abuse or not) and psychiatric diagnoses. A sample of 211 randomly-selected male inmates were interviewed. The Diagnostic Interview Schedule was used to assess psychiatric diagnoses. An additional questionnaire assessing childhood sexual abuse and perception of childhood sexual abuse was also administered. Forty percent of the inmates met standard criteria for childhood sexual abuse, which far exceeded rates found in the general population. Significant differences were found between inmates who had a history of childhood sexual abuse and those that did not for a variety of psychiatric diagnoses. Forty-one percent of those who met criteria for childhood sexual abuse did not consider themselves to have been abused. Those who did not consider themselves to have been abused had higher rates of alcohol abuse and dependence, while those who considered themselves to have been abused had higher rates of posttraumatic stress and obsessive-compulsive disorder. This study emphasizes the importance of perception or cognitive appraisal of the sexual experience (as abusive or not) and the need for further study regarding the potential mediating role of cognitive appraisal. Other implications of these findings include the need for primary prevention programs designed to reduce childhood sexual abuse, and inmate rehabilitation programs with an emphasis on the connection between victimization and criminality. 2 tables and numerous references. (Author abstract modified)

 

KEY TERMS:         sexual abuse;  imprisonment;  psychiatric diagnoses;  questionnaires;  posttraumatic stress disorder;  perception

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    Developmental and Etiological Characteristics of Children With Sexual Behavior Problems: Treatment Implications.

 

AUTHOR:               Gray, A.;  Pithers, W. D.;  Busconi, A.;  Houchens, P.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Abuse and Neglect

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Queensland Health, Brisbane (Australia). Child Protection Project.

 

SOURCE:                23(6): pp. 601-621;  New York, NY, Elsevier Science Ltd., June 1999

 

ABSTRACT:           Baseline data are reported on the demographics, psychological adjustment, victimization, and perpetration histories of 127 children 6 to 12 years of age who have engaged in developmentally unexpected sexual behaviors. Information regarding the children's caretakers, and their extended families, is also presented. Data were collected during intake of the families into a longitudinal treatment outcome study. The study methodology included a comprehensive battery of psychometric devices, a structured interview, and several behavior rating scales completed by the 127 children with sexual behavior problems and their primary caretakers. More than half of the children engaging in developmentally unexpected sexual behaviors had been abused both sexually and physically by more than 2 different perpetrators. One-third of the people who had maltreated these children were less than 18 years old. These children had acted out against an average of 2 other children. High levels of distress in the children and their caretakers were evident across a number of psychometric and historical variables. Children with sexual behavior problems exhibited a number of functional impairments commonly associated with maltreatment, including learning and psychiatric disorders. Their caretakers and families manifested several characteristics that deter children's recovery from treatment, including an impaired attachment between parent and child. The scope of the children's problems requires that treatment extend beyond the therapist's office to include schools and other agencies or individuals with whom the child and families have regular contact. 9 tables and numerous references. (Author abstract modified)

 

KEY TERMS:         sexual abuse;  child development;  behavior problems;  longitudinal studies;  behavior rating scales;  attachment;  outcomes

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    Disabled Children, Child Protection Systems and the Children Act of 1989.

 

AUTHOR:               Morris, J.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Abuse Review

 

SOURCE:                8(2): pp. 91-108;  New York, NY, John Wiley and Sons, Ltd., March-April 1999

 

ABSTRACT:           Children with disabilities are particularly vulnerable to abuse and a number of factors get in the way of protecting them. This article discusses research on the implementation of England's Children Act as it applies to children with disabilities and the findings from in-depth interviews with young disabled people. The research concluded that current child protection systems are not addressing the particular needs of children with disabilities; the Children Act regulations on short-term and long-term placements are often not complied with; and children and young people with disabilities have little say in decisions which affect them and few opportunities to communicate their experiences. 3 tables and numerous references. (Author abstract modified)

 

KEY TERMS:         children with disabilities;  child protection;  england;  placement

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.wiley.com

 

 

TITLE:                    Prevalence and Risk Factors for Childhood Sexual Abuse in Women: National Survey Findings.

 

AUTHOR:               Vogeltanz, N. D.;  Wilsnack, S. C.;  Harris, T. R.;  Wilsnack, R. W. et al.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child Abuse and Neglect

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks. Dept. of Psychology.

 

SOURCE:                23(6): pp. 579-592;  New York, NY, Elsevier Science Ltd., June 1999

 

ABSTRACT:           The authors interviewed a national sample of 1,099 women, age 18 years and older, to determine the prevalence and characteristics of childhood sexual abuse. The authors also examined which family and background variables were predictive of child sexual abuse in this sample. The study employed a series of detailed descriptive questions regarding childhood sexual experiences that were administered in a highly structured format by trained female interviewers. Childhood sexual abuse prevalence rates were calculated using 2 definitions of child sexual abuse, one of which was slightly more inclusive. Prevalence rates for the more inclusive child sexual abuse definition ranged from 21 to 32 percent, depending on how respondents who provided incomplete information about their sexual experiences were classified. The less inclusive childhood sexual abuse definition resulted in prevalence rates ranging from 15 to 26 percent. Additional information about the types of abuse experienced, perpetrator characteristics, age at first abuse, and physical and affective consequences of the abusive experiences are reported. The risk of childhood sexual abuse was related to higher scores on a measure of father's rejection, and the interaction between parental drinking status and whether the respondent had lived with both parents during childhood. Further analysis of this interaction suggests that when respondents reported living with both birth parents, they were most at risk for childhood sexual abuse when their father was a nondrinker and their mother was a drinker. The study concludes that childhood sexual abuse in girls is highly prevalent and strongly and consistently associated with several problems in adulthood. However, the link between childhood sexual abuse and adult psychopathology is not clearly understood. Given the prevalence of childhood sexual abuse and its harmful sequelae, there is a need for researchers to develop longitudinal and prospective designs in order to understand the processes involved. 9 tables, 1 figure, and numerous references. (Author abstract modified)

 

KEY TERMS:         prevalence;  risk factors;  national surveys;  sexual abuse;  sequelae;  adults abused as children;  interviews

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    Psychosocial Resources and Academic Performance in Abused Children.

 

AUTHOR:               Kinard, E. M.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Children and Youth Services Review

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    New Hampshire Univ., Durham. Family Research Lab.

 

SOURCE:                21(5): pp. 351-376;  New York, NY, Pergamon, May 1999

 

ABSTRACT:           Using the stress-social support-functioning model and the social network model of child development, this paper examined the impact of child abuse, maternal perceived social support, competence, depression, child perceived social support, and sociodemographic characteristics on child academic functioning. The sample consisted of 165 abused children and their mothers and a matched comparison group of 169 nonabused children and their mothers. Mothers and children were interviewed at 2 points, 1 year apart, and the children were between the ages of 7 and 11 years old at the time of the first interview. At time 1, lower achievement test scores were significantly predicted by abuse, lower perceived support from mothers, lower maternal education, male gender, and younger age. At time 2, abuse significantly predicted lower achievement scores on 2 of the 3 subtests even after controlling for time 1 scores. Abused children had lower grades in academic subjects, more days absent, more placements in special education programs, more retention in grade, and more school problems than did nonabused children. These findings held after controlling for maternal education, maternal employment, and child gender. An appendix provides the variables and coding scales used in the study questionnaires. 5 tables and numerous references. (Author abstract modified)

 

KEY TERMS:         academic achievement;  child development;  depression;  maternal behavior;  school children;  support systems;  interviews

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

 

TITLE:                    Enhancing Children's Memory Through Cognitive Interviewing: An Assessment Technique for Social Work Practice.

 

AUTHOR:               Aldridge, N. C.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Georgia Univ., Athens. School of Social Work.

 

SOURCE:                16(2): pp. 101-126;  New York, NY, Kluwer Academic-Human Sciences Press, April 1999

 

ABSTRACT:           This article summarizes current research on cognitive interviewing and discusses the theoretical rationale for the use of the mnemonic strategies, the enhancement in the cognitive interviewing technique, and the modifications and revisions conducted from using the cognitive interview with children ages 7 to 12 years. The cognitive interview is a memory retrieval procedure consisting of four general retrievals mnemonics which was developed to assist police officers in interviewing and interrogating witnesses. The cognitive interview has been accepted as one of the most successful interview techniques used in real-life investigations. The major conclusions drawn from the research are that the cognitive interview can enhance the completeness and accuracy of recollections by children and can offer a valuable technique for social workers interviewing and evaluating children who are victims or witnesses to crimes. 86 references. (Author abstract)

 

KEY TERMS:         memory;  assessment;  cognitive interviews;  child witnesses;  social workers;  investigations;  interviews;  research reviews

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.wkap.com

 

 

TITLE:                    Three Commentaries on When Cameras Roll, by Victor Vieth. (pro-gen).

 

AUTHOR:               Broderick, R.;  Berliner, L.;  Berkowitz, C. D.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL TITLE:    Journal of Child Sexual Abuse

 

AUTHOR AFFILIATION:    Lane County Child Advocacy Center, Eugene, OR.

 

SOURCE:                7(4): pp. 123-132;  Binghamton, NY, Haworth Press, Inc., 1999

 

ABSTRACT:           These three responses critique the concepts presented in an article published in the same issue of the journal about the dangers of using videotaped interviews of child witnesses in court. While the first response agrees with the recommendations of the original article for professional training and guidelines, it disagrees that a videotape of a bad interview cannot be useful to the court. The response asserts that viewers of a videotape have access to the entire interview, including mistakes that might otherwise be excluded in the interviewer's report. In addition, the videotape records the child's non-verbal response, which can be vital for determining the credibility of his or her statements. The second response also agrees that professionals should be trained in interview techniques. However, it disagrees with recommendations for legal requirements for number of hours in training, the need for training for defense attorneys and judges, modified court rules, and mandatory standards for interviews. Instead, emphasis should be placed on the strengths of child witnesses and the role of videotaping in documenting evidence. The third response focuses on the ethical and clinical implications of videotaping from the perspective of the interviewer. It expresses concerns that the interview techniques are being reviewed and evaluated by judges and attorneys with no knowledge of child development or interviews. 2 references.

 

KEY TERMS:         videotaping;  child witnesses;  courts responsibility;  judicial role;  lawyers role;  professional training;  investigations;  interviews

 

PUBLICATION TYPE:         Journal Article

 

INTERNET URL:   http://www.haworthpressinc.com

 

 

TITLE:                    When Cameras Roll: The Danger of Videotaping Child Abuse Victims Before the Legal System is Competent to Assess Children's Statements.

 

AUTHOR:               Vieth, V. I.

 

PUBLICATION YEAR:        1999

 

JOURNAL T